Quotes by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Share Your Quotes Join Us Inspire & Move Your Friends

How do you feel today?    I feel ...

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 March 24, 1882) was an American poet who wrote many works that are still famous today, including The Song of Hiawatha, Paul Revere's Ride and Evangeline. He also wrote the first ... more

Add to my favourites Get these quotes on a PDF
How beautiful is youth! how bright it gleams with its illusions, aspirations, dreams! Book of Beginnings, Story without End, Each maid a heroine, and each man a friend!

Let us, then, be up and doing, with a heart for any fate; still achieving, still pursuing, learn to labor and to wait.
Into each life some rain must fall, some days be dark and dreary.
We judge ourselves by what we feel capable of doing, while others judge us by what we have already done.
Talk not of wasted affection; affection never was wasted.
If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we would find in each person's life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.
Thy fate is the common fate of all; Into each life some rain must fall.
Love gives itself; it is not bought.
However things may seem, no evil thing is success and no good thing is failure.
It is foolish to pretend that one is fully recovered from a disappointed passion. Such wounds always leave a scar.
Know how sublime a thing it is to suffer and be strong.
Most people would succeed in small things if they were not troubled with great ambitions.
It is difficult to know at what moment love begins; it is less difficult to know that it has begun.
For age is opportunity no less than youth itself, though in another dress, and as the evening twilight fades away, the sky is filled with stars, invisible by day.
It is a beautiful trait in the lovers character, that they think no evil of the object loved.
It takes less time to do a thing right than to explain why you did it wrong.
Men of genius are often dull and inert in society; as the blazing meteor, when it descends to earth, is only a stone.
I shot an arrow into the air, It fell to earth, I knew not where; For so swiftly it flew, the sight Could not follow it in its flight. I breathed a song into the air, It fell to earth, I knew not where; For, who has sight so keen and strong That it can follow the flight of song? Long, long afterward, in an oak I found the arrow, still unbroken; And the song, from beginning to end, I found again in the heart of a friend.
Trouble is the next best thing to enjoyment. There is no fate in the world so horrible as to have no share in either its joys or sorrows.
A feeling of sadness and longing that is not akin to pain, and resembles sorrow only as the mist resembles the rain.
The heights by great men reached and kept were not attained by sudden flight, but they, while their companions slept, were toiling upward in the night.
Ships that pass in the night, and speak each other in passing, only a signal shown, and a distant voice in the darkness; So on the ocean of life, we pass and speak one another, only a look and a voice, then darkness again and a silence.
Therefore trust to thy heart, and to what the world calls illusions.
There is not grief that does not speak.
Well has it been said that there is no grief like the grief which does not speak.
And the night shall be filled with music, and the cares, that infest the day, shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, and as silently steal away.
I heard the bells on Christmas Day. Their old familiar carols play. And wild and sweet the words repeat. Of peace on earth goodwill to men.
Perseverance is a great element of success. If you only knock long enough and loud enough at the gate, you are sure to wake somebody.
He that respects himself is safe from others; He wears a coat of mail that none can pierce.
Simplicity in character, in manners, in style; in all things the supreme excellence is simplicity.
The greatest firmness is the greatest mercy.
THOU, too, sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O Union, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate!
When a great man dies, for years the light he leaves behind him, lies on the paths of men.
Intelligence and courtesy not always are combined; Often in a wooden house a golden room we find.
Whenever nature leaves a hole in a person's mind, she generally plasters it over with a thick coat of self-conceit.
Nature is a revelation of God; Art a revelation of man.
If you would hit the mark, you must aim a little above it; Every arrow that flies feels the attraction of earth.
Look not mournfully into the Past. It comes not back again. Wisely improve the Present. In is thine. Go forth to meet the shadowy Future, without fear, and a manly heart.
Thought takes man out of servitude, into freedom.
Life is real! Life is earnest! And death is not its goal. Dust thou art, to dust returneth, was not spoken of the soul.
Sometimes we may learn more from a man's errors, than from his virtues.
The Laws of Nature are just, but terrible. There is no weak mercy in them. Cause and consequence are inseparable and inevitable. The elements have no forbearance. The fire burns, the water drowns, the air consumes, the earth buries. And perhaps it would be well for our race if the punishment of crimes against the Laws of Man were as inevitable as the punishment of crimes against the Laws of Nature --were Man as unerring in his judgments as Nature.
All things come round to him who will but wait.
If you only knock long enough and loud enough at the gate, you are sure to wake up somebody.
Trust no future, however pleasant! Let the dead past bury its dead! Act -- act in the living Present! Heart within and God overhead.
We have not wings we cannot soar; but, we have feet to scale and climb, by slow degrees, by more and more, the cloudy summits of our time.
It is curious to note the old sea-margins of human thought! Each subsiding century reveals some new mystery; we build where monsters used to hide themselves.
Sit in reverie and watch the changing color of the waves that break upon the idle seashore of the mind.
Give what you have to somebody, it may be better than you think.
You know I say just what I think, and nothing more and less. I cannot say one thing and mean another.
No literature is complete until the language it was written in is dead.
Joy, temperance, and repose, slam the door on the doctor's nose.
Yes, we must ever be friends; and of all who offer you friendship Let me be ever the first, the truest, the nearest and dearest!
One half the world must sweat and groan that the other half may dream.
The lowest ebb is the turn of the tide.
A torn jacket is soon mended; but hard words bruise the heart of a child.
Whatever poet, orator, or sage may say of it, old age is still old age.
To be seventy years old is like climbing the Alps. You reach a snow-crowned summit, and see behind you the deep valley stretching miles and miles away, and before you other summits higher and whiter, which you may have strength to climb, or may not. Then you sit down and meditate and wonder which it will be.
Each morning sees some task begun, each evening sees it close; Something attempted, something done, has earned a night's repose.
Silently, one by one,in the infinite meadows of heaven, Blossomed the lovely stars, the forget-me-nots of the angels