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A man should look for what is, and not for what he thinks should be.

Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.
Science is nothing but perception.
Formal symbolic representation of qualitative entities is doomed to its rightful place of minor significance in a world where flowers and beautiful women abound.
There is only one way to achieve happiness on this terrestrial ball, and that is to have either a clear conscience or none at all.
Never do anything against conscience even if the state demands it.
If you look into your own heart, you find nothing wrong there, what is there to fear?
Interestingly, according to modern astronomers, space is finite. This is a very comforting thought - particularly for people who can never remember where they left things.
Our ideas must be as broad as Nature if they are to interpret Nature.
Science is the attempt to make the chaotic diversity of our sense experience correspond to a logically uniform system of thought.
The whole of science is nothing more than a refinement of everyday thinking.
Science is for those who learn, poetry is for those who know.
I feel bad that I don't feel worse.
Science is but an image of the truth.
If anybody says he can think about quantum physics without getting giddy, that only shows he has not understood the first thing about them.
The latest refinements of science are linked with the cruelties of the Stone Age.
Everybody's a mad scientist, and life is their lab. We're all trying to experiment to find a way to live, to solve problems, to fend off madness and chaos.
The man of science is a poor philosopher.
I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
The science of today is the technology of tomorrow.
Science fiction writers foresee the inevitable, and although problems and catastrophes may be inevitable, solutions are not.
The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience.
Freedom of conscience entails more dangers than authority and despotism.
There is only one duty, only one safe course, and that is to try to be right.
Every great advance in science has issued from a new audacity of imagination.
Faith is a fine invention when Gentleman can see -- but microscopes are prudent in an emergency
Science is the century-old endeavor to bring together by means of systematic thought the perceptible phenomena of this world into as thorough-going an association as possible.
Science can only ascertain what is, but not what should be, and outside of its domain value judgments of all kinds remain necessary.
When the number of factors coming into play in a phenomenological complex is too large scientific method in most cases fails.
Furnished as all Europe now is with Academies of Science, with nice instruments and the spirit of experiment, the progress of human knowledge will be rapid and discoveries made of which we have at present no conception. I begin to be almost sorry I was born so soon, since I cannot have the happiness of knowing what will be known a hundred years hence.
Science has explained nothing; the more we know the more fantastic the world becomes and the profounder the surrounding darkness.
The great tragedy of science is the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact.
Reason, observation, and experience; the holy trinity of science.
Science is organized knowledge.
Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today -- but the core of science fiction, its essence has become crucial to our salvation if we are to be saved at all.
One should be more concerned about what his conscience whispers than about what other people shout.
The voice of conscience is so delicate that it is easy to stifle it; but it is also so clear that it is impossible to mistake it.
He who sacrifices his conscience to ambition burns a picture to obtain the ashes.
Conscience: self-esteem with a halo.
I cannot and will not cut my conscience to fit this year's fashions.
There is one thing alone that stands the brunt of life throughout its length: a quiet conscience.
Organic chemistry is the chemistry of carbon compounds. Biochemistry is the study of carbon compounds that crawl.
When I am in the company of scientists, I feel like a shabby curate who has strayed by mistake into a drawing room full of dukes.
Whatever the scientists may say, if we take the supernatural out of life, we leave only the unnatural.
Science knows only one commandment -- contribute to science.
That is the essence of science: ask an impertinent question, and you are on the way to a pertinent answer.
No science is immune to the infection of politics and the corruption of power.
Science in the modern world has many uses; its chief use, however, is to provide long words to cover the errors of the rich.
A man ceases to be a beginner in any given science and becomes a master in that science when he has learned that he is going to be a beginner all his life.
Today the function of the artist is to bring imagination to science and science to imagination, where they meet, in the myth.
Art has a double face, of expression and illusion, just like science has a double face: the reality of error and the phantom of truth.
Where the world ceases to be the scene of our personal hopes and wishes, where we face it as free beings admiring, asking and observing, there we enter the realm of Art and Science
Neurophysiologists will not likely find what they are looking for, for that which they are looking for is that which is looking.
Science is the knowledge of consequences, and dependence of one fact upon another.
All science is either physics or stamp collecting.
Science is intimately integrated with the whole social structure and cultural tradition. They mutually support one other -- only in certain types of society can science flourish, and conversely without a continuous and healthy development and application of science such a society cannot function properly.
Vanity of science. Knowledge of physical science will not console me for ignorance of morality in time of affliction, but knowledge of morality will always console me for ignorance of physical science.
Science may be described as the art of systematic over-simplification.
Science is what you know, philosophy what you don't know.
Science is the great antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition.
Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire called conscience
A conscience is like a baby. It has to go to sleep before you can.
My conscience aches but it's going to lose the fight.
Conscience is the inner voice which warns us that someone may be looking.
A conscience without God is like a court without a judge.
Two things fill me with constantly increasing admiration and awe, the longer and more earnestly I reflect on them: the starry heavens without and the moral law within.
Conscience is the window of our spirit, evil is the curtain.
Conscience is a man's compass.
Conscience is the internal perception of the rejection of a particular wish operating within us.
A man's moral conscience is the curse he had to accept from the gods in order to gain from them the right to dream.
Honor is the moral conscience of the great.
No ear can hear nor tongue can tell the tortures of the inward hell!
Conscience is thoroughly well-bred and soon leaves off talking to those who do not wish to hear it.
A good conscience is a continual feast.
A good conscience is to the soul what health is to the body; it preserves constant ease and serenity within us; and more than countervails all the calamities and afflictions which can befall us from without.
The historian of science may be tempted to exclaim that when paradigms change, the world itself changes with them.
There is a single light of science, and to brighten it anywhere is to brighten it everywhere.
But how is one to make a scientist understand that there is something unalterably deranged about differential calculus, quantum theory, or the obscene and so inanely liturgical ordeals of the precession of the equinoxes.
Rather than have it the principal thing in my son's mind, I would gladly have him think that the sun went round the earth, and that the stars were so many spangles set in the bright blue firmament.
The microbe is so very small: You cannot take him out at all.
In science as in love, too much concentration on technique can often lead to impotence.
Art is meant to disturb. Science reassures.
Dissent is the native activity of the scientist, and it has got him into a good deal of trouble in the last years. But if that is cut off, what is left will not be a scientist. And I doubt whether it will be a man.
It doesn't matter whether you're talking about bombs or the intelligence quotients of one race as against another if a man is a scientist, like me, he'll always say Publish and be damned.
Science has nothing to be ashamed of even in the ruins of Nagasaki. The shame is theirs who appeal to other values than the human imaginative values which science has evolved.
The more we learn of science, the more we see that its wonderful mysteries are all explained by a few simple laws so connected together and so dependent upon each other, that we see the same mind animating them all.
I hate science. It denies a man's responsibility for his own deeds, abolishes the brotherhood that springs from God's fatherhood. It is a hectoring, dictating expertise, which makes the least lovable of the Church Fathers seem liberal by contrast. It is far easier for a Hitler or a Stalin to find a mock-scientific excuse for persecution than it was for Dominic to find a mock-Christian one.
They tend to be suspicious, bristly, paranoid-type people with huge egos they push around like some elephantiasis victim with his distended testicles in a wheelbarrow terrified no doubt that some skulking ingrate of a clone student will sneak into his very brain and steal his genius work.
Science has a simple faith, which transcends utility. Nearly all men of science, all men of learning for that matter, and men of simple ways too, have it in some form and in some degree. It is the faith that it is the privilege of man to learn to understand, and that this is his mission. If we abandon that mission under stress we shall abandon it forever, for stress will not cease. Knowledge for the sake of understanding, not merely to prevail, that is the essence of our being. None can define its limits, or set its ultimate boundaries.
Science, after all, is only an expression for our ignorance of our own ignorance.
Science is but the exchange of ignorance for that which is another kind of ignorance.
Science must have originated in the feeling that something was wrong.
O Star-eyed Science! hast thou wandered there, to waft us home the message of despair?
There are two kinds of truth; the truth that lights the way and the truth that warms the heart. The first of these is science, and the second is art. Without art science would be as useless as a pair of high forceps in the hands of a plumber. Without science art would become a crude mess of folklore and emotional quackery.
The true science and study of man, is man himself.
The ordinary scientific man is strictly a sentimentalist. He is a sentimentalist in this essential sense, that he is soaked and swept away by mere associations.
Our lifetime may be the last that will be lived out in a technological society.
Researchers, with science as their authority, will be able to cut [Animals] up, alive, into small pieces, drop them from a great height to see if they are shattered by the fall, or deprive them of sleep for sixteen days and nights continuously for the purposes of an iniquitous monograph... Animal trust, undeserved faith, when at last will you turn away from us? Shall we never tire of deceiving, betraying, tormenting animals before they cease to trust us?
Do you see this egg? With this you can topple every theological theory, every church or temple in the world.
The pursuit of science leads only to the insoluble.
Let me arrest thy thoughts; wonder with me, why plowing, building, ruling and the rest, or most of those arts, whence our lives are blest, by cursed Cain's race invented be, and blest Seth vexed us with Astronomy.
Thus will the fondest dream of Phallic science be realized: a pristine new planet populated entirely by little boy clones of great scientific entrepreneurs free to smash atoms, accelerate particles, or, if they are so moved, build pyramids -- without any social relevance or human responsibility at all.
The first rule of intelligent tinkering is to save all the parts.
What terrible questions we are learning to ask! The former men believed in magic, by which temples, cities, and men were swallowed up, and all trace of them gone. We are coming on the secret of a magic which sweeps out of men's minds all vestige of theism and beliefs which they and their fathers held and were framed upon.
Do what we can, summer will have its flies.
If they don't depend on true evidence, scientists are no better than gossips.
The pace of science forces the pace of technique. Theoretical physics forces atomic energy on us; the successful production of the fission bomb forces upon us the manufacture of the hydrogen bomb. We do not choose our problems, we do not choose our products; we are pushed, we are forced -- by what? By a system which has no purpose and goal transcending it, and which makes man its appendix.
Science rests on reason and experiment, and can meet an opponent with calmness; but a belief is always sensitive.
The real accomplishment of modern science and technology consists in taking ordinary men, informing them narrowly and deeply and then, through appropriate organization, arranging to have their knowledge combined with that of other specialized but equally ordinary men. This dispenses with the need for genius. The resulting performance, though less inspiring, is far more predictable.
There is an insistent tendency among serious social scientists to think of any institution which features rhymed and singing commercials, intense and lachrymose voices urging highly improbable enjoyment, caricatures of the human esophagus in normal and impaired operation, and which hints implausibly at opportunities for antiseptic seduction as inherently trivial. This is a great mistake. The industrial system is profoundly dependent on commercial television and could not exist in its present form without it.
Whether a person shows themselves to be a genius in science or in writing a song, the only point is, whether the thought, the discovery, or the deed, is living and can live on.
Science is analytical, descriptive, informative. Man does not live by bread alone, but by science he attempts to do so. Hence the deadliness of all that is purely scientific.
The credit of advancing science has always been due to individuals and never to the age.
Science has been seriously retarded by the study of what is not worth knowing and of what is not knowable.
Science is an integral part of culture. It's not this foreign thing, done by an arcane priesthood. It's one of the glories of the human intellectual tradition.
Science is the only truth and it is the great lie. It knows nothing, and people think it knows everything. It is misrepresented. People think that science is electricity, automobilism, and dirigible balloons. It is something very different. It is life devouring itself. It is the sensibility transformed into intelligence. It is the need to know stifling the need to live. It is the genius of knowledge vivisecting the vital genius.
Since we are assured that the all-wise Creator has observed the most exact proportions of number, weight and measure in the make of all things, the most likely way therefore to get any insight into the nature of those parts of the Creation which come within our observation must in all reason be to number, weigh and measure.
Well: what we gain by science is, after all, sadness, as the Preacher saith. The more we know of the laws and nature of the Universe the more ghastly a business we perceive it all to be -- and the non-necessity of it.
There are no better terms available to describe [The] difference between the approach of the natural and the social sciences than to call the former objective and the latter subjective. ... While for the natural scientist the contrast between objective facts and subjective opinions is a simple one, the distinction cannot as readily be applied to the object of the social sciences. The reason for this is that the object, the facts of the social sciences are also opinions -- not opinions of the student of the social phenomena, of course, but opinions of those whose actions produce the object of the social scientist.
Everywhere you look in science, the harder it becomes to understand the universe without God.
Science, which cuts its way through the muddy pond of daily life without mingling with it, casts its wealth to right and left, but the puny boatmen do not know how to fish for it.
There is not much that even the most socially responsible scientists can do as individuals, or even as a group, about the social consequences of their activities.
To overturn orthodoxy is no easier in science than in philosophy, religion, economics, or any of the other disciplines through which we try to comprehend the world and the society in which we live.
The mythology of science asserts that with many different scientists all asking their own questions and evaluating the answers independently, whatever personal bias creeps into their individual answers is cancelled out when the large picture is put together. This might conceivably be so if scientists were women and men from all sorts of different cultural and social backgrounds who came to science with very different ideologies and interests. But since, in fact, they have been predominantly university-trained white males from privileged social backgrounds, the bias has been narrow and the product often reveals more about the investigator than about the subject being researched.
We are living now, not in the delicious intoxication induced by the early successes of science, but in a rather grisly morning-after, when it has become apparent that what triumphant science has done hitherto is to improve the means for achieving unimproved or actually deteriorated ends.
I know of no department of natural science more likely to reward a man who goes into it thoroughly than anthropology. There is an immense deal to be done in the science pure and simple, and it is one of those branches of inquiry which brings one into contact with the great problems of humanity in every direction.
Science is simply common sense at its best--that is, rigidly accurate in observation, and merciless to fallacy in logic.
In scientific work, those who refuse to go beyond fact rarely get as far as fact.
It is inexcusable for scientists to torture animals; let them make their experiments on journalists and politicians.
There comes a time when every scientist, even God, has to write off an experiment.
Man lives for science as well as bread.
We have genuflected before the god of science only to find that it has given us the atomic bomb, producing fears and anxieties that science can never mitigate.
For undemocratic reasons and for motives not of State, they arrive at their conclusions -- largely inarticulate. Being void of self-expression they confide their views to none; but sometimes in a smoking room, one learns why things were done.
The worst state of affairs is when science begins to concern itself with art.
Scientists are peeping toms at the keyhole of eternity.
Science is a game we play with God, to find out what his rules are.
Science is spectral analysis. Art is light synthesis.
In everything that relates to science, I am a whole Encyclopaedia behind the rest of the world.
Science is all metaphor.
The future of humanity is uncertain, even in the most prosperous countries, and the quality of life deteriorates; and yet I believe that what is being discovered about the infinitely large and infinitely small is sufficient to absolve this end of the century and millennium. What a very few are acquiring in knowledge of the physical world will perhaps cause this period not to be judged as a pure return of barbarism.
The scientific mind does not so much provide the right answers as ask the right questions.
Science is the systematic classification of experience.
When we say science we can either mean any manipulation of the inventive and organizing power of the human intellect: or we can mean such an extremely different thing as the religion of science, the vulgarized derivative from this pure activity manipulated by a sort of priestcraft into a great religious and political weapon.
The puritanical potentialities of science have never been forecast. If it evolves a body of organized rites, and is established as a religion, hierarchically organized, things more than anything else will be done in the name of decency. The coarse fumes of tobacco and liquors, the consequent tainting of the breath and staining of white fingers and teeth, which is so offensive to many women, will be the first things attended to.
The most heated defenders of a science, who cannot endure the slightest sneer at it, are commonly those who have not made very much progress in it and are secretly aware of this defect.
There is no greater impediment to progress in the sciences than the desire to see it take place too quickly.
It is a good morning exercise for a research scientist to discard a pet hypothesis every day before breakfast. It keeps him young.
If it can't be expressed in figures, it's not science it's opinion.
Truth in science can best be defined as the working hypothesis best suited to open the way to the next better one.
Science has always been too dignified to invent a good backscratcher.
The product of mental labor -- science -- always stands far below its value, because the labor-time necessary to reproduce it has no relation at all to the labor-time required for its original production.
Natural science will in time incorporate into itself the science of man, just as the science of man will incorporate into itself natural science: there will be one science.
There's not a whole lot of new atoms out there.
In science, all facts no matter how trivial, enjoy democratic equality.
The negative cautions of science are never popular. If the experimentalist would not commit himself, the social philosopher, the preacher, and the pedagogue tried the harder to give a short-cut answer.
From man or angel the great Architect did wisely to conceal, and not divulge his secrets to be scanned by them who ought rather admire; or if they list to try conjecture, he his fabric of the heavens left to their disputes, perhaps to move his laughter at their quaint opinions wide hereafter, when they come to model heaven calculate the stars, how they will wield the mighty frame, how build, unbuild, contrive to save appearances, how gird the sphere with centric and eccentric scribbled o'er, and epicycle, orb in orb.
Every formula which expresses a law of nature is a hymn of praise to God.
Science has proof without any certainty. Creationists have Certainty without any proof.
The sciences do not try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models. By a model is meant a mathematical construct which, with the addition of certain verbal interpretations describes observed phenomena. The justification of such a mathematical construct is solely and precisely that it is expected to work.
Oh, how much is today hidden by science! Oh, how much it is expected to hide!
Science has not solved problems, only shifted the points of problems.
There does not exist a category of science to which one can give the name applied science. There are science and the applications of science, bound together as the fruit of the tree which bears it.
There are no such things as applied sciences, only applications of science.
Traditional scientific method has always been at the very best, 20 -- 20 hindsight. It's good for seeing where you've been. It's good for testing the truth of what you think you know, but it can't tell you where you ought to go.
If the study of all these sciences which we have enumerated, should ever bring us to their mutual association and relationship, and teach us the nature of the ties which bind them together, I believe that the diligent treatment of them will forward the objects which we have in view, and that the labor, which otherwise would be fruitless, will be well bestowed.
I have hardly ever known a mathematician who was capable of reasoning.
Nevertheless, in order to imbue civilization with sound principles and enliven it with the spirit of the gospel, it is not enough to be illumined with the gift of faith and enkindled with the desire of forwarding a good cause. For this end it is necessary to take an active part in the various organizations and influence them from within. And since our present age is one of outstanding scientific and technical progress and excellence, one will not be able to enter these organizations and work effectively from within unless he is scientifically competent, technically capable and skilled in the practice of his own profession.
One science only will one genius fit; so vast is art, so narrow human wit.
Science is not about control. It is about cultivating a perpetual sense of wonder in the face of something that forever grows one step richer and subtle than our latest theory about it. It is about reverence, not mastery.
Science is Christian, not when it condemns itself to the letter of things, but when, in the infinitely little, it discovers as many mysteries and as much depth and power as in the infinitely great.
It is not easy to imagine how little interested a scientist usually is in the work of any other, with the possible exception of the teacher who backs him or the student who honors him.
It is sometimes important for science to know how to forget the things she is surest of.
A body of work such as Pasteur's is inconceivable in our time: no man would be given a chance to create a whole science. Nowadays a path is scarcely opened up when the crowd begins to pour in.
Nothing leads the scientist so astray as a premature truth.
When a scientist is ahead of his times, it is often through misunderstanding of current, rather than intuition of future truth. In science there is never any error so gross that it won't one day, from some perspective, appear prophetic.
The work of science is to substitute facts for appearances, and demonstrations for impressions.
Aristotle could have avoided the mistake of thinking that women have fewer teeth than men, by the simple device of asking Mrs. Aristotle to keep her mouth open while he counted.
In science men have discovered an activity of the very highest value in which they are no longer, as in art, dependent for progress upon the appearance of continually greater genius, for in science the successors stand upon the shoulders of their predecessors; where one man of supreme genius has invented a method, a thousand lesser men can apply it.
Can a society in which thought and technique are scientific persist for a long period, as, for example, ancient Egypt persisted, or does it necessarily contain within itself forces which must bring either decay or explosion?
Science is nothing but developed perception, interpreted intent, common sense rounded out and minutely articulated.
Science becomes dangerous only when it imagines that it has reached its goal.
Science is always wrong, it never solves a problem without creating ten more.
He had been eight years upon a project for extracting sunbeams out of cucumbers, which were to be put into vials hermetically sealed, and let out to warm the air in raw, inclement summers.
If we knew all the laws of Nature, we should need only one fact, or the description of one actual phenomenon, to infer all the particular results at that point. Now we know only a few laws, and our result is vitiated, not, of course, by any confusion or irregularity in Nature, but by our ignorance of essential elements in the calculation. Our notions of law and harmony are commonly confined to those instances which we detect; but the harmony which results from a far greater number of seemingly conflicting, but really concurring, laws, which we have not detected, is still more wonderful. The particular laws are as our points of view, as, to the traveler, a mountain outline varies with every step, and it has an infinite number of profiles, though absolutely but one form. Even when cleft or bored through it is not comprehended in its entireness.
True science investigates and brings to human perception such truths and such knowledge as the people of a given time and society consider most important. Art transmits these truths from the region of perception to the region of emotion.
Scientists have odious manners, except when you prop up their theory; then you can borrow money of them.
Science is a cemetery of dead ideas.
Isn't it marvelous how those scientists know the names of all those stars?
Science means simply the aggregate of all the recipes that are always successful. All the rest is literature.
Science is feasible when the variables are few and can be enumerated; when their combinations are distinct and clear. We are tending toward the condition of science and aspiring to do it. The artist works out his own formulas; the interest of science lies in the art of making science.
If politicians and scientists were lazier, how much happier we should all be.
The effort to understand the universe is one of the very few things that lifts human life a little above the level of farce, and gives it some of the grace of tragedy.
To us, men of the West, a very strange thing happened at the turn of the century; without noticing it, we lost science, or at least the thing that had been called by that name for the last four centuries. What we now have in place of it is something different, radically different, and we don't know what it is. Nobody knows what it is.
Man has to awaken to wonder -- and so perhaps do peoples. Science is a way of sending him to sleep again.
Everything is becoming science fiction. From the margins of an almost invisible literature has sprung the intact reality of the 20th century.
Science fiction writers, I am sorry to say, really do not know anything. We can't talk about science, because our knowledge of it is limited and unofficial, and usually our fiction is dreadful.
The fancy that extraterrestrial life is by definition of a higher order than our own is one that soothes all children, and many writers.
In sci-fi convention, life-forms that hadn't developed space travel were mere prehistory -- horse-shoe crabs of the cosmic scene -- and something of the humiliation of being stuck on a provincial planet in a galactic backwater has stayed with me ever since.
What the hell is nostalgia doing in a science-fiction film? With the whole universe and all the future to play in, Lucas took his marvelous toys and crawled under the fringed cloth on the parlor table, back into a nice safe hide hole, along with Flash Gordon and the Cowardly Lion and Luke Skywalker and the Flying Aces and the Hitler Jugend. If there's a message there, I don't think I want to hear it.
If science fiction is the mythology of modern technology, then its myth is tragic.
Where everything is possible miracles become commonplaces, but the familiar ceases to be self-evident.
Space or science fiction has become a dialect for our time.
Science fiction films are not about science. They are about disaster, which is one of the oldest subjects of art.
I have been a soreheaded occupant of a file drawer labeled Science Fiction and I would like out, particularly since so many serious critics regularly mistake the drawer for a urinal.
The person that loses their conscience has nothing left worth keeping.
God may forgive your sins, but your nervous system won t.
A bad conscience has a very good memory
Conscience in most men, is but the anticipation of the opinions of others.
There is no witness so terrible and no accuser so powerful as conscience which dwells within us.
We grow with years more fragile in body, but morally stutter, and can throw off the chill of a bad conscience almost at once.
Conscience has no more to do with gallantry than it has with politics.
My conscience hath a thousand several tongues, and every tongue brings in a several tale, and every tale condemns me for a villain.
Religions are the great fairy tales of conscience.
Conscience does make cowards of us all.
What a man calls his conscience is merely the mental action that follows a sentimental reaction after too much wine or love.
Conscience is the voice of the soul; the passions of the body.
A clear conscience is a soft pillow.
In many walks of life, a conscience is a more expensive encumbrance than a wife or a carriage.
Conscience is the dog that can't bite, but never stops barking.
Conscience has nothing to do as lawgiver or judge; but is a witness against me if I do wrong, and which approves if I do right. To act against conscience is to act against reason and God's Law.
Men never do evil so fully and cheerfully as when we do it out of conscience.
Conscience is the chamber of justice.
Again and again I am brought up against it, and again and again I resist it: I don't want to believe it, even though it is almost palpable: the vast majority lack an intellectual conscience; indeed, it often seems to me that to demand such a thing is to be in the most populous cities as solitary as in the desert.
I think remorse ought to stop biting the consciences that feed it.
While conscience is our friend, all is at peace; however once it is offended, farewell to a tranquil mind.
Conscience is a mother-in-law whose visit never ends.
Our conscience is not the vessel of eternal verities. It grows with our social life, and a new social condition means a radical change in conscience.
A seared conscience is one whose warning voice has been suppressed and perverted habitually, so that eventually instead of serving as a guide, it only confirms the person in his premeditatedly evil course.
Though the dungeon, the scourge, and the executioner be absent, the guilty mind can apply the goad and scorch with blows.
Conscience is the sentinel of virtue.
Conscience was the barmaid of the Victorian soul. Recognizing that human beings were fallible and that their failings, though regrettable, must be humored, conscience would permit, rather ungraciously perhaps, the indulgence of a number of carefully selected desires.
A man's conscience and his judgment is the same thing; and as the judgment, so also the conscience, may be erroneous.
People talk about the conscience, but it seems to me one must just bring it up to a certain point and leave it there. You can let your conscience alone if you're nice to the second housemaid.
In the depths of every heart, there is a tomb and a dungeon, though the lights, the music, and revelry above may cause us to forget their existence, and the buried ones, or prisoners whom they hide. But sometimes, and oftenest at midnight, those dark receptacles are flung wide open. In an hour like this, when the mind has a passive sensibility, but no active strength; when the imagination is a mirror, imparting vividness to all ideas, without the power of selecting or controlling them; then pray that your grieves may slumber, and the brotherhood of remorse not break their chain.
If a superior give any order to one who is under him which is against that man's conscience, although he do not obey it yet he shall not be dismissed.
Conscience -- the only incorruptible thing about us.
The beginning of compunction is the beginning of a new life.
Rules of society are nothing; ones conscience is the umpire.
O conscience, upright and stainless, how bitter a sting to thee is a little fault!
Conscience is our magnetic compass; reason our chart.
The innocent seldom find an uncomfortable pillow.
When I contemplate the accumulation of guilt and remorse which, like a garbage-can, I carry through life, and which is fed not only by the lightest action but by the most harmless pleasure, I feel Man to be of all living things the most biologically incompetent and ill-organized. Why has he acquired a seventy years life-span only to poison it incurably by the mere being of himself? Why has he thrown Conscience, like a dead rat, to putrefy in the well?
A man's conscience, like a warning line on the highway, tells him what he shouldn't do -- but it does not keep him from doing it.
It is far more important to me to preserve an unblemished conscience than to compass any object however great.
The conscience is the most flexible material in the world. Today you cannot stretch it over a mole hill; while tomorrow it can hide a mountain.
What we call conscience in many instances, is only a wholesome fear of the law.
The conscience is the sacred haven of the liberty of man.
The chief prerequisite for a escort is to have a flexible conscience and an inflexible politeness.
Reason often makes mistakes, but conscience never does.
The Non-Conformist Conscience makes cowards of us all.
Conscience is the mirror of our souls, which represents the errors of our lives in their full shape.
If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first invent the universe.
Entering a cell, penetrating deep as a flying saucer to find a new galaxy would be an honorable task for a new scientist interested more in the inner state of the soul than in outer space.
The object of science is the universal that contains many particulars; the object of art is the particular that contains the universal.