Quotes about Relationship

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Some of the biggest challenges in relationships come from the fact that most people enter a relationship in order to get something: they're trying to find someone who's going to make them feel good. In reality, the only way a relationship will last is if you see your relationship as a place that you go to give, and not a place that you go to take.

We are never more discontented with others than when we are discontented with ourselves.
A relationship, I think, is like a shark, you know? It has to constantly move forward or it dies. And I think what we got on our hands is a dead shark.
The only way of knowing a person is to love them without hope.
Treasure your relationships, not your possessions.
Each relationship nurtures a strength or weakness within you.
Almost all of our sorrows spring out of our relations with other people.
The formula for achieving a successful relationship is simple: you should treat all disasters as if they were trivialities but never treat a triviality as if it were a disaster.
The ultimate test of a relationship is to disagree but to hold hands.
The quality of your life is the quality of your relationships.
The easiest kind of relationship is with ten thousand people, the hardest is with one.
In matters of truth and justice, there is no difference between large and small problems, for issues concerning the treatment of people are all the same.
Do good to your friends to keep them, to your enemies to win them.
Assumptions are the termites of relationships.
People must be taken as they are, and we should never try make them or ourselves better by quarreling with them.
The most important ingredient we put into any relationship is not what we say or what we do, but what we are. And if our words and our actions come from superficial human relations techniques (the Personality Ethic) rather than from our own inner core (the Character Ethic), others will sense that duplicity. We simply won't be able to create and sustain the foundation necessary for effective interdependence.
It takes a lot of experience of life to see why some relationships last and others do not. But we do not have to wait for a crisis to get an idea of the future of a particular relationship. Our behavior in little every incidents tells us a great deal.
It is easier to live through someone else than to become complete yourself.
It is only when we no longer compulsively need someone that we can have a real relationship with them.
If you're in a relationship and you want to make it work, you have to be a little selfless at times.
Constant togetherness is fine -- but only for Siamese twins.
The Inside-Out approach to personal and interpersonal effectiveness means to start first with self; even more fundamentally, to start with the most inside part of self -- with your paradigms, your character, and your motives. The inside-out approach says that private victories precede public victories, that making and keeping promises to ourselves recedes making and keeping promises to others. It says it is futile to put personality ahead of character, to try to improve relationships with others before improving ourselves.
It is explained that all relationships require a little give and take. This is untrue. Any partnership demands that we give and give and give and at the last, as we flop into our graves exhausted, we are told that we didn't give enough.
Relationships are like a dance, with visible energy racing back and forth between partners. Some relationships are the slow, dark dance of death.
All things need watching, working at, caring for and marriage is no exception. Marriage is not something to be treated indifferently, or abused or something that simply takes care of itself. Nothing neglected will remain as it was or is, or will fail to deteriorate. All things need attention care and concern and especially so in this most sensitive of all relationships of life.
You will always move toward anyone who increases you and away from anyone who makes you less.
It is the things in common that make relationships enjoyable, bit it is the little differences that make them interesting.
There is no substitute for the comfort supplied by the utterly taken-for-granted relationship.
If we want to be loved, we must disclose ourselves. If we want to love someone, he must permit us to know him. This would seem to be obvious. Yet most of us spend a great part of our lives thinking up ways to avoid becoming known. Indeed, much of human life is best described as impersonation. We are role players, every one of us. We say that we feel things we do not feel. We say things we did not do. We say that we believe things we do not believe. We pretend that we are loving when we are full of hostility. We pretend that we are calm and indifferent when we are actually trembling with anxiety and fear. Of course we cannot tell even the people we know and love everything we think or feel. But our mistakes are nearly always in the other direction. Even in families -- good families -- people wear masks a great deal of the time.
For me, the highest level of sexual excitement is in a monogamous relationship.
The key to any good relationship, on-screen and off, is communication, respect, and I guess you have to like the way the other person smells -- and he smelled real nice.
The thing that's between us is fascination, and the fascination resides in our being alike. Whether you're a man or a woman, the fascination resides in finding out that we're alike.
Kindness and intelligence don't always deliver us from the pitfalls and traps: there are always failures of love, of will, of imagination. There is no way to take the danger out of human relationships.
Long-term commitment to an intimate relationship with one person of whatever sex is an essential need that people have in order to breed the qualities out of which nurturing thought can rise.
Relationships are the hallmark of the mature person.
Two may talk together under the same roof for many years, yet never really meet; and two others at first speech are old friends.
People who are having a love-sex relationship are continuously lying to each other because the very nature of the relationship demands that they do, because you have to make a love object of this person, which means that you editorialize about them. You cut out what you don't want to see, you add this if it isn't there. And so therefore you're building a lie.
Relationships based on obligation lack dignity.
When people are like each other they tend to like each other.
A person isn't who they are during the last conversation you had with them - they're who they've been throughout your whole relationship

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