Marriage Quotes

Share Your Quotes Join Us Inspire & Move Your Friends

How do you feel today?    I feel ...

These are quotes tagged with "marriage".

Add to my favourites Get these quotes on a PDF
Marriage must be a relation either of sympathy or of conquest.

I would rather be a beggar and single than a queen and married.
When the blind lead the blind, no wonder they both fall into -- matrimony.
Wasn't marriage, like life, unstimulating and unprofitable and somewhat empty when too well ordered and protected and guarded? Wasn't it finer, more splendid, more nourishing, when it was, like life itself, a mixture of the sordid and the magnificent; of mud and stars; of earth and flowers; of love and hate and laughter and tears and ugliness and beauty and hurt.
When widows exclaim loudly against second marriages, I would always lay a wager that the man, if not the wedding day, is absolutely fixed on.
One fool at least in every married couple.
I'm going to marry a Jewish woman because I like the idea of getting up Sunday morning and going to the deli.
Deceive not thyself by over-expecting happiness in the married estate. Remember the nightingales which sing only some months in the spring, but commonly are silent when they have hatched their eggs, as if their mirth were turned into care for their young ones.
To be sure a stepmother to a girl is a different thing to a second wife to a man!
In taking out an insurance policy one pays for it in dollars and cents, always at liberty to discontinue payments. If, however, woman's premium is a husband, she pays for it with her name, her privacy, her self-respect, her very life, until death doth part.
You, that are going to be married, think things can never be done too fast: but we that are old, and know what we are about, must elope methodically, madam.
I grew up in a very large family in a very small house. I never slept alone until after I was married.
Instead of getting married again. I'm going to find a woman I don't like and give her a house.
Only one marriage I regret. I remember after I got that marriage license I went across from the license bureau to a bar for a drink. The bartender said, What will you have, sir? And I said, A glass of hemlock.
I should like to see any kind of a man, distinguishable from a gorilla that some good and even pretty woman could not shape a husband out of.
Polygamy is an endeavor to get more out of life than there is in it.
Americans, who make more of marrying for love than any other people, also break up more or their marriages, but the figure reflects not so much the failure of love as the determination not to live without it.
Marriage is the torment of one, the felicity of two, the strife and enmity of three.
Marriage is like wine. It is not properly judged until the second glass.
Marriage is an act of will that signifies and involves a mutual gift, which unites the spouses and binds them to their eventual souls, with whom they make up a sole family --a domestic church.
By taking a second wife he pays the highest compliment to the first, by showing that she made him so happy as a married man, that he wishes to be so a second time.
It is not from reason and prudence that people marry, but from inclination.
There is, indeed, nothing that so much seduces reason from vigilance, as the thought of passing life with an amiable woman.
Marriage has many pains, but celibacy has no pleasures.
Bigamy is having one husband too many. Monogamy is the same.
There is a rhythm to the ending of a marriage just like the rhythm of a courtship--only backward. You try to start again but get into blaming over and over. Finally you are both worn out, exhausted, hopeless. Then lawyers are called in to pick clean the corpses. The death has occurred much earlier.
I never knew what real happiness was until I got married and by then it was too late.
Marrying a man is like buying something you've been admiring for a long time in a shop window. You may love it when you get it home, but it doesn't always go with everything else in the house.
Marriage brings one into fatal connection with custom and tradition, and traditions and customs are like the wind and weather, altogether incalculable.
Sensual pleasures have the fleeting brilliance of a comet; a happy marriage has the tranquillity of a lovely sunset.
My whole working philosophy is that the only stable happiness for mankind is that it shall live married in blessed union to woman-kind --intimacy, physical and psychical between a man and his wife. I wish to add that my state of bliss is by no means perfect.
Progress of a marriage: There was a time when you couldn't make me happy. Now the time has come when you can make me unhappy.
Many a man in love with a dimple makes the mistake of marrying the whole girl.
Rituals are important. Nowadays it's hip not to be married. I'm not interested in being hip.
Marriages are made in heaven and consummated on Earth.
The sum and substance of female education in America, as in England, is training women to consider marriage as the sole object in life, and to pretend that they do not think so.
Any one must see at a glance that if men and women marry those whom they do not love, they must love those whom they do not marry.
A marriage without conflicts is almost as inconceivable as a nation without crises.
There's a way of transferring funds that is even faster than electronic banking. It's called marriage.
Say what you will, making marriage work is a woman's business. The institution was invented to do her homage; it was contrived for her protection. Unless she accepts it as such --as a beautiful, bountiful, but quite unequal association --the going will be hard indeed.