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New York is not Mecca. It just smells like it.

There is no quiet place in the white man's cities. No place to hear the unfurling of leaves in spring, or the rustle of an insect's wings. But perhaps it is because I am a savage and do not understand. The clatter only seems to insult the ears.
Boston is a moral and intellectual nursery always busy applying first principles to trifles.
I look upon those pitiful concretions of lime and clay which spring up, in mildewed forwardness, out of the kneaded fields about our capital... not merely with the careless disgust of an offended eye, not merely with sorrow for a desecrated landscape, but with a painful foreboding that the roots of our national greatness must be deeply cankered when they are thus loosely struck in their native ground. The crowded tenements of a struggling and restless population differ only from the tents of the Arab or the Gipsy by their less healthy openness to the air of heaven, and less happy choice of their spot of earth; by their sacrifice of liberty without the gain of rest, and of stability without the luxury of change.
Just as language has no longer anything in common with the thing it names, so the movements of most of the people who live in cities have lost their connection with the earth; they hang, as it were, in the air, hover in all directions, and find no place where they can settle.
Living in cities is an art, and we need the vocabulary of art, of style, to describe the peculiar relationship between man and material that exists in the continual creative play of urban living. The city as we imagine it, then, soft city of illusion, myth, aspiration, and nightmare, is as real, maybe more real, than the hard city one can locate on maps in statistics, in monographs on urban sociology and demography and architecture.
Who goes to Rome a beast returns a beast.
All great art is born of the metropolis.
A city is a large community where people are lonesome together.
Any city however small, is in fact divided into two, one the city of the poor, the other of the rich. These are at war with one another.
Washington is a place where politicians don't know which way is up and taxes don't know which way is down.
Today's city is the most vulnerable social structure ever conceived by man.
There is no solitude in the world like that of the big city.
An artist has no home in Europe except in Paris.
The chief function of the city is to convert power into form, energy into culture, dead matter into the living symbols of art, biological reproduction into social creativity.
The city is not a concrete jungle. It is a human zoo.
New York, the nation's thyroid gland.
America is a nation with no truly national city, no Paris, no Rome, no London, no city which is at once the social center, the political capital, and the financial hub.
Either these [unsaved] people are to be evangelized, or the leaven of communism and infidelity will assume such enormous proportions that it will break you in a reign of terror such as this country has never known.
The city is loveliest when the sweet death racket begins. Her own life lived in defiance of nature, her electricity, her frigidaires, her soundproof walls, the glint of lacquered nails, the plumes that wave across the corrugated sky. Here in the coffin depths grow the everlasting flowers sent by telegraph.
I have never felt salvation in nature. I love cities above all.
A city is a place where there is no need to wait for next week to get the answer to a question, to taste the food of any country, to find new voices to listen to and familiar ones to listen to again.
The city as a center where, any day in any year, there may be a fresh encounter with a new talent, a keen mind or a gifted specialist -- this is essential to the life of a country. To play this role in our lives a city must have a soul -- a university, a great art or music school, a cathedral or a great mosque or temple, a great laboratory or scientific center, as well as the libraries and museums and galleries that bring past and present together. A city must be a place where groups of women and men are seeking and developing the highest things they know.
The two elements the traveler first captures in the big city are extra human architecture and furious rhythm. Geometry and anguish. At first glance, the rhythm may be confused with gaiety, but when you look more closely at the mechanism of social life and the painful slavery of both men and machines, you see that it is nothing but a kind of typical, empty anguish that makes even crime and gangs forgivable means of escape.
New York now leads the world's great cities in the number of people around whom you shouldn't make a sudden move.
The crime problem in New York is getting really serious. The other day the Statue of Liberty had both hands up.
Towns oftener swamp one than carry one out onto the big ocean of life.
If one had but a single glance to give the world, one should gaze on Istanbul.
We will neglect our cities to our peril, for in neglecting them we neglect the nation.
Washington is a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm.
All things may be bought in Rome with money.
The faces in New York remind me of people who played a game and lost.
Prepare for death, if here at night you roam, and sign your will before you sup from home.
But look what we have built low-income projects that become worse centers of delinquency, vandalism and general social hopelessness than the slums they were supposed to replace. Cultural centers that are unable to support a good bookstore. Civic centers that are avoided by everyone but bums. Promenades that go from no place to nowhere and have no promenaders. Expressways that eviscerate great cities. This is not the rebuilding of cities. This is the sacking of cities.
A large city cannot be experientially known; its life is too manifold for any individual to be able to participate in it.
Washington is an endless series of mock palaces clearly built for clerks.
In Washington, the first thing people tell you is what their job is. In Los Angeles you learn their star sign. In Houston you're told how rich they are. And in New York they tell you what their rent is.
There is a time of life somewhere between the sullen fugues of adolescence and the retrenchments of middle age when human nature becomes so absolutely absorbing one wants to be in the city constantly, even at the height of summer.
There is more sophistication and less sense in New York than anywhere else on the globe.
What else can you expect from a town that's shut off from the world by the ocean on one side and New Jersey on the other?