Heroes and heroism Quotes

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These are quotes tagged with "heroes-and-heroism".

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Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

Sometimes, when one person is missing, the whole world seems depopulated.
A hero is a man who is afraid to run away.
Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duty, and so bear ourselves that if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, This was their finest hour.
The hero draws inspiration from the virtue of his ancestors.
A hero is no braver than an ordinary man, but he is braver five minutes longer.
It doesn't take a hero to order men into battle. It takes a hero to be one of those men who goes into battle.
The greatest obstacle to being heroic is the doubt whether one may not be going to prove one's self a fool; the truest heroism is to resist the doubt; and the profoundest wisdom, to know when it ought to be resisted, and when it be obeyed.
The characteristic of genuine heroism is its persistency. All men have wandering impulses, fits and starts of generosity. But when you have resolved to be great, abide by yourself, and do not weakly try to reconcile yourself with the world. The heroic cannot be the common, nor the common the heroic.
I think of a hero as someone who understands the degree of responsibility that comes with his freedom.
One brave deed makes no hero.
What makes a hero truly great is that they never despair.
You cannot be a hero without being a coward.
We can't all be heroes, because somebody has to sit on the curb and clap as they go by.
Most people aren't appreciated enough, and the bravest things we do in our lives are usually known only to ourselves. No one throws ticker tape on the man who chose to be faithful to his wife, on the lawyer who didn't take the drug money, or the daughter who held her tongue again and again. All this anonymous heroism.
The ordinary man is involved in action, the hero acts. An immense difference.
What is a hero without love for mankind.
A hero is someone we can admire without apology.
The idol of today pushes the hero of yesterday out of our recollection; and will, in turn, be supplanted by his successor of tomorrow.
What with making their way and enjoying what they have won, heroes have no time to think. But the sons of heroes --ah, they have all the necessary leisure.
A boy doesn't have to go to war to be a hero; he can say he doesn't like pie when he sees there isn't enough to go around.
Aspire rather to be a hero than merely appear one.
A hero is someone right who doesn't change.
Heroism feels and never reasons, and therefore is always right.
The poetry of heroism appeals irresistibly to those who don't go to a war, and even more to those whom the war is making enormously wealthy. It's always so.
True heroism consists in being superior to the ills of life, in whatever shape they may challenge us to combat.
The hero is one who kindles a great light in the world, who sets up blazing torches in the dark streets of life for men to see by.
If we are marked to die, we are enough to do our country loss; and if to live, the fewer men, the greater share of honor.
Heroes are not known by the loftiness of their carriage; the greatest braggarts are generally the merest cowards.
And how can man die better than facing fearful odds, for the ashes of his fathers, and the temples of his Gods?
My heroes are and were my parents. I can't see having anyone else as my heroes.
Be your own hero, it's cheaper than a movie ticket.
No man is a hero to his valet. This is not because the hero is no hero, but because the valet is a valet.
I offer neither pay, nor quarters, nor food; I offer only hunger, thirst, forced marches, battles and death. Let him who loves his country with his heart, and not merely with his lips, follow me.
Bardot, Byron, Hitler, Hemingway, Monroe, Sade: we do not require our heroes to be subtle, just to be big. Then we can depend on someone to make them subtle.
The legacy of heroes is the memory of a great name and the inheritance of a great example.
Heroism is not only in the man, but in the occasion.
To have no heroes is to have no aspiration, to live on the momentum of the past, to be thrown back upon routine, sensuality, and the narrow self.
Unhappy the land that is in need of heroes.
In our world of big names, curiously, our true heroes tend to be anonymous. In this life of illusion and quasi-illusion, the person of solid virtues who can be admired for something more substantial than his well-knownness often proves to be the unsung hero: the teacher, the nurse, the mother, the honest cop, the hard worker at lonely, underpaid, unglamorous, unpublicized jobs.