Books reading Quotes

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These are quotes tagged with "books-reading".

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The mortality of all inanimate things is terrible to me, but that of books most of all.

A book might be written on the injustice of the just.
My books kept me from the ring, the dog-pit, the tavern, and the saloon.
Be as careful of the books you read, as of the company you keep; for your habits and character will be as much influenced by the former as by the latter.
The most foolish kind of a book is a kind of leaky boat on the sea of wisdom; some of the wisdom will get in anyhow.
All good books are alike in that they are truer than if they had really happened and after you are finished reading one you will feel that all that happened to you and afterwards it all belongs to you; the good and the bad, the ecstasy, the remorse, and sorrow, the people and the places and how the weather was.
The greatest gift is the passion for reading. It is cheap, it consoles, it distracts, it excites, it gives you knowledge of the world and experience of a wide kind. It is a moral illumination.
I have read your book and much like it.
Thank you for sending me a copy of your book -- I'll waste no time reading it.
Learning to read has been reduced to a process of mastering a series of narrow, specific, hierarchical skills. Where armed-forces recruits learn the components of a rifle or the intricacies of close order drill by the numbers, recruits to reading learn its mechanics sound by sound and word by word.
As writers become more numerous, it is natural for readers to become more indolent; whence must necessarily arise a desire of attaining knowledge with the greatest possible ease.
The first time I read an excellent work, it is to me just as if I gained a new friend; and when I read over a book I have perused before, it resembles the meeting of an old one.
I read part of it all the way through.
I know every book of mine by its smell, and I have but to put my nose between the pages to be reminded of all sorts of things.
Books are those faithful mirrors that reflect to our mind the minds of sages and heroes.
Today a reader, tomorrow a leader.
It does not follow because many books are written by persons born in America that there exists an American literature. Books which imitate or represent the thoughts and life of Europe do not constitute an American literature. Before such can exist, an original idea must animate this nation and fresh currents of life must call into life fresh thoughts along the shore.
The books that everybody admires are those that nobody reads.
I suggest that the only books that influence us are those for which we are ready, and which have gone a little further down our particular path than we have yet got ourselves.
Read in order to live.
One always tends to overpraise a long book, because one has got through it.
There is a set of religious, or rather moral, writings which teach that virtue is the certain road to happiness, and vice to misery in this world. A very wholesome and comfortable doctrine, and to which we have but one objection, namely, that it is not true.
If the riches of the Indies, or the crowns of all the kingdom of Europe, were laid at my feet in exchange for my love of reading, I would spurn them all.
We are as liable to be corrupted by books, as by companions.
When you reread a classic, you do not see more in the book than you did before; you see more in you than there was before.
We are too civil to books. For a few golden sentences we will turn over and actually read a volume of four or five hundred pages.
Books are the best of things if well used; if abused, among the worst. They are good for nothing but to inspire. I had better never see a book than be warped by its attraction clean out of my own orbit, and made a satellite instead of a system.
Never read any book that is not a year old.
Our high respect for a well read person is praise enough for literature.
Readers are less and less seen as mere non-writers, the subhuman other or flawed derivative of the author; the lack of a pen is no longer a shameful mark of secondary status but a positively enabling space, just as within every writer can be seen to lurk, as a repressed but contaminating antithesis, a reader.
You will, I am sure, agree with me that... if page 534 only finds us in the second chapter, the length of the first one must have been really intolerable.
I always like to look on the optimistic side of life, but I am realistic enough to know that life is a complex matter.
There is no Frigate like a book to take us lands away nor any coursers like a page of prancing Poetry.
The world of books is the most remarkable creation of man nothing else that he builds ever lasts monuments fall; nations perish; civilization grow old and die out; new races build others. But in the world of books are volumes that have seen this happen again and again and yet live on. Still young, still as fresh as the day they were written, still telling men's hearts, of the hearts of men centuries dead.
I heard his library burned down and both books were destroyed -- and one of them hadn't even been colored in yet.
The man who is fond of books is usually a man of lofty thought, and of elevated opinions.
Next, in importance to books are their titles.
A good book is the very essence of a good man. His virtues survive in it, while the foibles and faults of his actual life are forgotten. All the goodly company of the excellent and great sit around my table, or look down on me from yonder shelves, waiting patiently to answer my questions and enrich me with their wisdom. A precious book is a foretaste of immortality.
The successful Accelerated Reader is able to read larger than normal blocks or bites of the printed page with each eye stop. He has accepted, without reservation, the philosophy that the most important benefit of reading is the gaining of information, ideas, mental picture and entertainment-not the fretting over words. He has come to the realization that words in and of themselves are for the most part insignificant.
You are wise, witty and wonderful, but you spend too much time reading this sort of stuff.