Age and aging Quotes

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These are quotes tagged with "age-and-aging".

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O Time and change! -- with hair as gray as was my sire's that winter day, how strange it seems, with so much gone of life and love, to still live on!

There's no such thing as old age, there is only sorrow.
Age carries all things away, even the mind.
They are all gone into the world of light, and I alone sit lingering here.
But it's hard to be hip over thirty when everyone else is nineteen, when the last dance we learned was the Lindy, and the last we heard, girls who looked like Barbara Streisand were trying to do something about it.
Now that I am sixty, I see why the idea of elder wisdom has passed from currency.
Thirty--the promise of a decade of loneliness, a thinning list of single men to know, a thinning brief-case of enthusiasm, thinning hair.
One of those men who reach such an acute limited excellence at twenty-one that everything afterward savors of anti-climax.
Old age may seem a long way off. But on the day it doesn't, it will be too late to do anything about it.
Age withers only the outside.
In a few days I'll have lived one score and three days in this vale of tears. On I plod --always bored, often drunk, doing no penance for my faults --rather do I become more tolerant of myself from day to day, hardening my crystal heart with blasphemous humor and shunning only toothpicks, pathos, and poverty as being the three unforgivable things in life.
If you're starting to look wrinkled, don't worry. It covers the scars.
It is a toss up whether it is worse to be old and bent or young and broke.
An old-timer is one who remembers when it cost more to run a car than to park it.
Whether sixty or sixteen, there is in every human being's heart the lure of wonder, the unfailing child-like appetite of what's next, and the joy of the game of living. In the center of your heart and my heart there is a wireless station; so long as it receives messages of beauty, hope, cheer, courage and power from men and from the infinite, so long are you young.
When the aerials are down, and your spirit is covered with snows of cynicism and the ice of pessimism, then you are grown old, even at twenty, but as long as your aerials are up, to catch the waves of optimism, there is hope you may die young at eighty.
Years may wrinkle the skin, but to give up enthusiasm wrinkles the soul. Worry, fear, self-distrust bows the heart and turns the spirit back to dust.
With sixty staring me in the face, I have developed inflammation of the sentence structure and definite hardening of the paragraphs.
I'm 65 and I guess that puts me in with the geriatrics. But if there were fifteen months in every year, I'd only be 48. That's the trouble with us. We number everything. Take women, for example. I think they deserve to have more than twelve years between the ages of 28 and 40.
Old age is the most unexpected of all the things that can happen to a man.
I will never give in to old age until I become old. And I'm not old yet!
For the first fourteen years for a rod they do while for the next as a pearl in the world they do shine. For the next trim beauty beginneth to swerve. For the next matrons or drudges they serve. For the next doth crave a staff for a stay. For the next a bier to fetch them away.
The youth gets together his materials to build a bridge to the moon, or, perchance, a palace or temple on the earth, and, at length, the middle-aged man concludes to build a woodshed with them.
How earthy old people become --moldy as the grave! Their wisdom smacks of the earth. There is no foretaste of immortality in it. They remind me of earthworms and mole crickets.
No man was ever so completely skilled in the conduct of life, as not to receive new information from age and experience.
There is not a more repulsive spectacle than on old man who will not forsake the world, which has already forsaken him.
Old things are always in good repute, present things in disfavor.
There cannot live a more unhappy creature than an ill-natured old man, who is neither capable of receiving pleasures, nor sensible of conferring them on others.
The latter part of a wise person's life is occupied with curing the follies, prejudices and false opinions they contracted earlier.
The trick is growing up without growing old.
What a man knows at fifty that he did not know at twenty is for the most part incommunicable.
A healthy old fellow, who is not a fool, is the happiest creature living.
That man never grows old who keeps a child in his heart.
Every man over forty is a scoundrel.
That old man dies prematurely whose memory records no benefits conferred. They only have lived long who have lived virtuously.
It is a bore, I admit, to be past seventy, for you are left for execution, and are daily expecting the death-warrant; but it is not anything very capital we quit. We are, at the close of life, only hurried away from stomach-aches, pains in the joints, from sleepless nights and unamusing days, from weakness, ugliness, and nervous tremors; but we shall all meet again in another planet, cured of all our defects.
Being over seventy is like being engaged in a war. All our friends are going or gone and we survive amongst the dead and the dying as on a battlefield.
Old age adds to the respect due to virtue, but it takes nothing from the contempt inspired by vice; it whitens only the hair.
I'd like to grow very old as slowly as possible.
I have always felt that a woman has the right to treat the subject of her age with ambiguity until, perhaps, she passes into the realm of over ninety. Then it is better she be candid with herself and with the world.