Age and aging Quotes

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These are quotes tagged with "age-and-aging".

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If youth knew; if age could.

Some men are born old, and some men never seem so. If we keep well and cheerful, we are always young and at last die in youth even when in years would count as old.
Middle age is youth without levity, and age without decay.
At twenty a man is full of fight and hope. He wants to reform the world. When he is seventy he still wants to reform the world, but he know he can't.
The really frightening thing about middle age is that you know you'll grow out of it!
There are three classes into which all the women past seventy that ever I knew were to be divided: 1. That dear old soul; 2. That old woman; 3. That old witch.
To resist the frigidity of old age, one must combine the body, the mind, and the heart. And to keep these in parallel vigor one must exercise, study, and love.
Men of age object too much, consult too long, adventure too little, repent too soon, and seldom drive business home to the full period, but content themselves with a mediocrity of success.
Discern of the coming on of years, and think not to do the same things still; for age will not be defied.
The class distinctions proper to a democratic society are not those of rank or money, still less, as is apt to happen when these are abandoned, of race, but of age.
Aging seems to be the only available way to live a long life.
I refuse to admit that I am more than 52, even if that makes my children illegitimate.
The person of wisdom is the person of years.
Every man is the creature of the age in which he lives; very few are able to raise themselves above the ideas of the time.
You are young at any age if you are planning for tomorrow.
When we are young we take pains to be agreeable, and when we are old we take pains not to be disagreeable.
Nobody grows old merely by living a number of years. We grow old by deserting our ideals.
I am admonished in many ways that time is pushing me inexorably along. I am approaching the threshold of age; in 1977 I shall be 142. This is no time to be flitting about the earth. I must cease from the activities proper to youth and begin to take on the dignities and gravities and inertia proper to that season of honorable senility which is on its way.
Every one desires to live long, but no one would be old.
When you are younger you get blamed for crimes you never committed and when you're older you begin to get credit for virtues you never possessed. It evens itself out.
Lord, Lord, how subject we old men are to this vice of lying!
My age is as a lusty winter, frosty but kindly.
The golden age is before us, not behind us.
When a noble life has prepared old age, it is not decline that it reveals, but the first days of immortality.
There is nothing more despicable than an old man who has no other proof than his age to offer of his having lived long in the world.
Gray hairs seem to my fancy like the soft light of the moon, silvering over the evening of life.
The older the fiddler, the sweeter the tune.
Old age though despised, is coveted by all.
It takes a long time to become young.
You can judge your age by the amount of pain you feel when you come in contact with a new idea.
When you get to my age life seems little more than one long march to and from the lavatory.
Minds ripen at very different ages.
The older I grow the more I distrust the familiar doctrine that age brings wisdom.
Men of my age live in a state of continual desperation.
What makes old age hard to bear is not the failing of one's faculties, mental and physical, but the burden of one's memories.
Old age has its pleasures, which, though different, are not less than the pleasures of youth.
Age is not all decay; it is the ripening, the swelling, of the fresh life within, that withers and bursts the husk.
Whatever poet, orator, or sage may say of it, old age is still old age.
To be seventy years old is like climbing the Alps. You reach a snow-crowned summit, and see behind you the deep valley stretching miles and miles away, and before you other summits higher and whiter, which you may have strength to climb, or may not. Then you sit down and meditate and wonder which it will be.
The great secret that all old people share is that you really haven't changed in seventy or eighty years. Your body changes, but you don't change at all. And that, of course, causes great confusion.