Quotes by William Shakespeare

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Born ca. 1564 and died ca. 1616 during the Renaissance period (1450-1599). One of the greatest writers of all time, Shakespeare, the peerless poet of the Sonnets and the creator of such dramatic masterpieces as Romeo and Juliet, ... more

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He that hath a beard is more than a youth, and he that hath no beard is less than a man.

These earthly godfathers of Heaven's lights, that give a name to every fixed star, have no more profit of their shining nights than those that walk and know not what they are.
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers. For he today that sheds his blood with me shall be my brother; be never so vile. This day shall gentle his condition. And gentlemen in England now abed shall think themselves accursed they were not here, and hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks that fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.
Tis the soldier's life to have their balmy slumbers waked with strife.
Your tale, sir, would cure deafness.
O thou invisible spirit of wine, if thou hast no name to be known by, let us call thee devil.
Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty; for in my youth I never did apply hot and rebellious liquors in my blood; and did not, with unbashful forehead, woo the means of weakness and debility: therefore my age is as a lusty winter, frosty but kindly.
He's winding up the watch of his wit. By and by it will strike.
man, proud man,Dressd in a little brief authority,
O, but man, proud man! Drest in a little brief authority; Most ingorant of what he's most assur'd, His glassy essence,-like an angry ape, Plays such fantastic tricks before high heaven, As make the angels weep;
While you live tell the truth and shame the devil.
And thus the whirligig of time brings in his revenges.
Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my King, He would not in mine age have left me naked to mine enemies.
The world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
Misery acquaints a man with strange bedfellows.
Is it not strange that sheep's guts should hale souls out of men's bodies?
We were not born to sue, but to command.
We have seen better days.
If all the year were playing holidays, To sport would be as tedious as to work; But when they seldom come, they wish'd for come, And nothing pleaseth but rare accidents.
O world, how apt the poor are to be proud!
Bow, stubborn knees!
Beware of the ides of March.
Canst thou not minister to a mind diseased, pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow, raze out the written troubles of the brain, and with some sweet oblivious antidote cleanse the fraught bosom of that perilous stuff which weighs upon the heart?
Strong reasons make strong actions.
For I am full of spirit and resolve to meet all perils very constantly.
Nothing will come of nothing.
Fear no more the heat o the sun, nor the furious winter's rages. Thou thy worldly task hast done, home art gone and taken thy wages.
Our life, exempt from public haunt, finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, sermons in stones, and good in everything.
Heat not a furnace for your foe so hot that it do singe yourself.
Some rise by sin, and some by virtue fall.
When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions.
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May.
To climb steep hills requires slow pace at first.
Present mirth hath present laughter. What's to come is still unsure.
It was Greek to me.
My salad days, when I was green in judgment.
Alas, poor Yorick! I knew him, Horatio: a fellow of infinite jest, of most excellent fancy. Where be your jibes now, your gambols, your songs, your flashes of merriment that were wont to set the table on a roar?
I had rather be a toad, and live upon the vapor of a dungeon than keep a corner in the thing I love for others uses.
No legacy is so rich as honestly.
Much Ado About Nothing,
If we are marked to die, we are enough to do our country loss; and if to live, the fewer men, the greater share of honor.
Oppose not rage while rage is in its force, but give it way a while and let it waste.
But O, how bitter a thing it is to look into happiness through another man's eyes.
Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form; Then, have I reason to be fond of grief? Fare you well! Had you such a loss as I, I could give better comfort than you do.
Rich gifts wax poor when givers prove unkind.
The friends thou hast, and their adoption tried, grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel, but do not dull thy palm with entertainment of each new-hatched unfledged comrade.
Fearless minds climb soonest into crowns.
There is tide in the affairs of men, which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune; omitted, all the voyage of their life is bound in shallows and in miseries; on such a full sea we are now afloat; and we must take the current the clouds folding and unfolding beyond the horizon. when it serves, or lose our ventures.
Death makes no conquest of this conqueror: For now he lives in fame, though not in life.
There is occasions and causes why and wherefore in all things.
When workmen strive to do better than well, they do confound their skill in covetousness.
The apparel oft proclaims the man.
The weariest and most loathed worldly life, that age, ache, penury and imprisonment can lay on nature is a paradise, to what we fear of death.
Conceit, more rich in matter than in words, brags of his substance: they are but beggars who can count their worth.
When you fear a foe, fear crushes your strength; and this weakness gives strength to your opponents.
How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is to have a thankless child.
When we are born we cry that we are come.. to this great stage of fools.
This is the excellent foppery of the world: that when we are sick in fortune -- often the surfeits of our own behavior -- we make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and stars, as if we were villains on necessity, fools by heavenly compulsion, knaves, thieves, and treachers by spherical predominance, drunkards, liars, and adulterers by an enforced obedience of planetary influence. An admirable evasion of whoremaster man, to lay his goatish disposition on the charge of a star!
O, had I but followed the arts!
In a false quarrel there is no true valor.