Quotes by Toni Morrison

Get quotes of the day


How do you feel today?    I feel ...

When there is pain, there are no words. All pain is the same.

She is a friend of mind. She gather me, man. The pieces I am, she gather them and give them back to me in all the right order. It's good, you know, when you got a woman who is a friend of your mind
How soon country people forget. When they fall in love with a city it is forever, and it is like forever. As though there never was a time when they didn't love it. The minute they arrive at the train station or get off the ferry and glimpse the wide streets and the wasteful lamps lighting them, they know they are born for it. There, in a city, they are not so much new as themselves: their stronger, riskier selves.
There is really nothing more to say except why. But since why is difficult to handle, one must take refuge in how.
Als er een boek is dat je écht wilt lezen maar het is nog niet geschreven, dan moet jij het schrijven.
Wanneer ik schrijf dan vertaal ik niet voor blanke lezers... Dostoevsky schreef voor een Russisch publiek maar toch kunnen we zijn werk lezen. Als ik specifiek schrijf en ik niet te veel uitleg, dan kan iedereen me begrijpen.
Ik denk dat de emoties en percepties waar ik toegang tot heb als een zwart iemand en als een vrouwelijk iemand, ruimer zijn dan iemand die geen van beide is... Dus lijkt het me dat dit gegeven m'n leefwereld niet verkleind heeft als zwarte, vrouwelijke schrijver. Dit maakte m'n leefwereld alleen maar groter.
Zwarte literatuur wordt aangeleerd als sociologie, als tolerantie, niet als een serieuze of rigoureuze kunstvorm.
… I wish I’d a knowed more people. I would of loved ’em all. If I’d a knowed more, I would a loved more.
Two parents can’t raise a child any more than one. You need a whole community—everybody—to raise a child.
Of course I'm a black writer. I'm not just a black writer, but categories like black writer, woman writer and Latin American writer aren't marginal anymore. We have to acknowledge that the thing we call literature is more pluralistic now, just as society ought to be. The melting pot never worked. We ought to be able to accept on equal terms everybody from the Hasidim to Walter Lippmann, from the Rastafarians to Ralph Bunche.
But I think women dwell quite a bit on the duress under which they work, on how hard it is just to do it at all. We are traditionally rather proud of ourselves for having slipped creative work in there between the domestic chores and obligations. I’m not sure we deserve such big A-pluses for all that.