Quotes by Benjamin Franklin

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Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 April 17, 1790) was one of the most prominent of Founders and early political figures and statesmen of the United States. Considered the earliest of the Founders, Franklin was noted for his ... more

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If your riches are yours, why don't you take them with to the other world?

Be studious in your profession, and you will be learned. Be industrious and frugal, and you will be rich. Be sober and temperate, and you will be healthy. Be in general virtuous, and you will be happy. At least you will, by such conduct, stand the best chance for such consequences.
Observe all men, thyself most.
If you would have a faithful servant, and one that you like, serve yourself.
Half wits talk much, but say little.
He that speaks much, is much mistaken.
You will find the key to success under the alarm clock.
They who give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.
He that has done you a kindness will be more ready to do you another, than he whom you yourself have obliged.
Take time for all things; great haste makes great waste.
Your net worth to the world is usually determined by what remains after your bad habits are subtracted from your good ones.
When befriended, remember it; when you befriend, forget it.
To be thrown upon one's own resources, is to be cast into the very lap of fortune; for our faculties then undergo a development and display an energy of which they were previously unsusceptible.
I look upon death to be as necessary to our constitution as sleep. We shall rise refreshed in the morning.
Let the child's first lesson be obedience, and the second will be what thou wilt.
He that blows the coals in quarrels that he has nothing to do with, has no right to complain if the sparks fly in his face.
Many foxes grow gray but few grow good.
Energy and persistence conquer all things.
It is the working man who is the happy man. It is the idle man who is the miserable man.
I should have no objection to go over the same life from its beginning to the end: requesting only the advantage authors have, of correcting in a second edition the faults of the first.
Savages we call them because their manners differ from ours.
An undutiful daughter will prove an unmanageable wife.
Creditors have better memories than debtors.
When men and woman die, as poets sung, his heart's the last part moves, her last, the tongue.
Money has never made man happy, nor will it, there is nothing in its nature to produce happiness. The more of it one has the more one wants.
He that is of the opinion money will do everything may well be suspected of doing everything for money.
The use of money is all the advantage there is in having money.
He's the best physician that knows the worthlessness of the most medicines.
Many a man thinks he is buying pleasure, when he is really selling himself to it.
Pride that dines on vanity, sups on contempt.
Who is rich? He that rejoices in his portion.
Furnished as all Europe now is with Academies of Science, with nice instruments and the spirit of experiment, the progress of human knowledge will be rapid and discoveries made of which we have at present no conception. I begin to be almost sorry I was born so soon, since I cannot have the happiness of knowing what will be known a hundred years hence.
He who falls in love with himself will have no rivals.
Write injuries in dust, benefits in marble.
We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride and four times as much by our foolishness.
Leisure is the time for doing something useful. This leisure the diligent person will obtain the lazy one never.
Learn of the skillful; he that teaches himself, has a fool for his master.
A life of leisure and a life of laziness are two things. There will be sleeping enough in the grave.
God works wonders now and then; Behold a lawyer, an honest man.
She laughs at everything you say. Why? Because she has fine teeth.
Don't judge men's wealth or godliness by their Sunday appearance.
Nothing is more fatal to health than an over care of it.
Each year one vicious habit discarded, in time might make the worst of us good.
Those who govern, having much business on their hands, do not generally like to take the trouble of considering and carrying into execution new projects. The best public measures are therefore seldom adopted from previous wisdom, but forced by the occasion.
In general, mankind, since the improvement of cookery, eats twice as much as nature requires.
Friends and neighbors, the taxes are indeed very heavy, and if those laid on by the government were the only ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly; and from these taxes the commissioners cannot ease or deliver us by allowing abatement.
In the affairs of this world, men are saved not by faith, but by the want of it.
Remember that credit is money.
If we do not hang together, we will all hang separately.
Constant complaint is the poorest sort of pay for all the comforts we enjoy.
Certainty? In this world nothing is certain but death and taxes.
In this world nothing can be said to be certain, except death and taxes.
A single man has not nearly the value he would have in a state of union. He is an incomplete animal. He resembles the odd half of a pair of scissors.
I think that a young state, like a young virgin, should modestly stay at home, and wait the application of suitors for an alliance with her; and not run about offering her amity to all the world; and hazarding their refusal. Our virgin is a jolly one; and tho at present not very rich, will in time be a great fortune, and where she has a favorable predisposition, it seems to me well worth cultivating.
Our necessities never equal our wants.
Wealth is not his that has it, but his that enjoys it.
He does not posses wealth that allows it to possess him.
The doors of wisdom are never shut.
What vast additions to the conveniences and comforts of living might mankind have acquired, if the money spent in wars had been employed in works of public utility; what an extension of agriculture even to the tops of our mountains; what rivers rendered navigable, or joined by canals; what bridges, aqueducts, new roads, and other public works, edifices, and improvements might not have been obtained by spending those millions in doing good, which in the last war have been spent in doing mischief.
The way to wealth depends on just two words, industry and frugality.