Quotes by Charles Caleb Colton

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Charles Caleb Colton (1780 - 1832), was an English cleric, writer and collector, well known for his eccentricities.

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Friendship often ends in love; but love in friendship, never.

If you cannot inspire a woman with love of you, fill her above the brim with love of herself; all that runs over will be yours.
To sentence a man of true genius, to the drudgery of a school is to put a racehorse on a treadmill.
There are three modes of bearing the ills of life, by indifference, by philosophy, and by religion.
Books, like friends, should be few and well chosen. Like friends, too, we should return to them again and again for, like true friends, they will never fail us -- never cease to instruct -- never cloy.
Next to acquiring good friends, the best acquisition is that of good books.
Constant success shows us but one side of the world; adversity brings out the reverse of the picture.
True friendship is like sound health, the value of it is seldom known until it be lost.
As no roads are so rough as those that have just been mended, so no sinners are so intolerant as those that have just turned saints.
Silence is foolish if we are wise, but wise if we are foolish.
Nothing more completely baffles one who is full of tricks and duplicity than straight forward and simple integrity in another.
Patience is the support of weakness; impatience the ruin of strength
There is this difference between happiness and wisdom, that he that thinks himself the happiest man, really is so; but he who thinks himself the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.
Times of great calamity and confusion have been productive for the greatest minds. The purest ore is produced from the hottest furnace. The brightest thunder-bolt is elicited from the darkest storm.
Deliberate with caution, but act with decision; and yield with graciousness or oppose with firmness.
Subtract from the great man all that he owes to opportunity, all that he owes to chance, and all that he gained by the wisdom of his friends and the folly of his enemies, and the giant will often be seen to be a pygmy.
There is this paradox in pride -- it makes some men ridiculous, but prevents others from becoming so.
Those that are the loudest in their threats are the weakest in their actions.
The intoxication of anger, like that of the grape, shows us to others, but hides us from ourselves.
There are two way of establishing a reputation, one to be praised by honest people and the other to be accused by rogues. It is best, however, to secure the first one, because it will always be accompanied by the latter.
Avarice has ruined more souls than extravagance.
Liberty will not descend to a people; a people must raise themselves to liberty; it is a blessing that must be earned before it can be enjoyed.
Were we as eloquent as angels we still would please people much more by listening rather than talking.
The mistakes of the fool are known to the world, but not to himself. The mistakes of the wise man are known to himself, but not to the world.
The greatest friend of truth is Time, her greatest enemy is Prejudice, and her constant companion is Humility.
He that thinks he is the happiest man, really is so. But he that thinks he is the wisest, is generally the greatest fool.
Life isn't like a book. Life isn't logical or sensible or orderly. Life is a mess most of the time. And theology must be lived in the midst of that mess.
Grant graciously what you cannot refuse safely and conciliate those you cannot conquer.
Philosophy is a bully that talks loud when the danger is at a distant; but, the moment she is pressed hard by an enemy, she is nowhere to be found and leaves the brunt of the battle to be fought by her steady, humble comrade, religion.
To know the pains of power, we must go to those who have it; to know its pleasures, we must go to those who are seeking it. The pains of power are real; its pleasures imaginary.
The consequences of things are not always proportionate to the apparent magnitude of those events that have produced them. Thus the American Revolution, from which little was expected, produced much; but the French Revolution, from which much was expected, produced little.
It is always safe to learn, even from our enemies; seldom safe to venture to instruct, even our friends.
He that knows himself, knows others; and he that is ignorant of himself, could not write a very profound lecture on other men's heads.
We own almost all our knowledge not to those who have agreed but to those who have differed.
To despise our own species is the price we must often pay for knowledge of it.
Honor is unstable and seldom the same; for she feeds upon opinion, and is as fickle as her food.
Friendship, of itself a holy tie, is made more sacred by adversity.
The family is the most basic unit of government. As the first community to which a person is attached and the first authority under which a person learns to live, the family establishes society's most basic values.
Doubt is the vestibule through which all must pass before they can enter into the temple of wisdom.
Pedantry is the showy display of knowledge which crams our heads with learned lumber and then takes out our brains to make room for it.
Physical courage, which engages all danger, will make a person brave in one way; and moral courage, which defies all opinion, will make a person brave in another.
He that will believe only what he can fully comprehend must have a long head or a very short creed.
Men's arguments often prove nothing but their wishes.
Theories are private property, but truth is common stock.
If you would be known, and not know, vegetate in a village; if you would know, and not be known, live in a city.
Time; that black and narrow isthmus between two eternities.
Much may be done in those little shreds and patches of time, which every day produces, and which most men throw away, but which nevertheless will make at the end of it no small deduction for the life of man.
Love is an alliance of friendship and animalism; if the former predominates it is passion exalted and refined; if the latter, gross and sensual.
Never join with your friend when he abuses his horse or his wife, unless the one is to be sold and the other to be buried.
Contemporaries appreciate the person rather than their merit, posterity will regard the merit rather than the person.
Moderation is the inseparable companion of wisdom, but with it genius has not even a nodding acquaintance.
Our income are like our shoes; if too small, they gall and pinch us; but if too large, they cause us to stumble and trip.
Corruption is like a ball of snow, once it's set a rolling it must increase.
Mystery is not profoundness.
Mystery magnifies danger, as a fog the sun, the hand that warned Belshazzar derived its horrifying effect from the want of a body.
Opinions, like showers, are generated in high places, but they invariably descend into lower ones, and ultimately flow down to the people as rain unto the sea.
Great minds must be ready not only to take opportunities, but to make them.
To look back to antiquity is one thing, to go back to it is another.
Pity is a thing often vowed, seldom felt; hatred is a thing often felt, seldom avowed.
Power will intoxicate the best hearts, as wine the strongest heads. No man is wise enough, nor good enough to be trusted with unlimited power.