Quotes by Grover Cleveland

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Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885 1889) and 24th (1893 1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. He was the only Democrat elected to the presidency in the era of Republican political domination between the American Civil War and the election of Woodrow Wilson in 1912 (Andrew Johnson is considered a Democrat, although he was technically elected under the National Union Party ticket, not the Democratic one). more

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The United States is not a nation to which peace is a necessity.

Though the people support the government; the government should not support the people.
The ship of Democracy, which has weathered all storms, may sink through the mutiny of those aboard.
There is no calamity which a great nation can invite which equals that which follows a supine submission to wrong and injustice and the consequent loss of national self-respect and honor, beneath which are shielded and defended a people's safety and greatness.
Your every voter, as surely as your chief magistrate, exercises a public trust.
The trusts and combinationsthe communism of pelfwhose machinations have prevented us from reaching the success we deserved, should not be forgotten nor forgiven.
And still the question, What shall be done with our ex-Presidents? is not laid at rest; and I sometimes think Wattersons solution of it, Take them out and shoot them, is worthy of attention.
I believe that the public temper is such that the voters of the land are prepared to support the party which gives the best promise of administering the government in the honest, simple, and plain manner which is consistent with its character and purposes. They have learned that mystery and concealment in the management of their affairs cover tricks and betrayal. The statesmanship they require consists in honesty and frugality, a prompt response to the needs of the people as they arise, and a vigilant protection of all their varied interests.
It is a condition which confronts usnot a theory.
The lessons of paternalism ought to be unlearned and the better lesson taught that while the people should patriotically and cheerfully support their Government its functions do not include the support of the people.
It is the duty of those serving the people in public place closely to limit public expenditures to the actual needs of the government economically administered, because this bounds the right of the government to extract tribute from the earnings of labor or the property of the citizen, and because public extravagance begets extravagance among the people. We should never be ashamed of the simplicity and prudential economies which are best suited to the operation of a republican form of government and most compatible with the mission of the American people. Those who are selected for a limited time to manage public affairs are still of the people, and may do much by their example to encourage, consistently with the dignity of their official functions, that plain way of life which among their fellow-citizens aids integrity and promotes thrift and prosperity.