Quotes by Marcus T. Cicero

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Marcus Tullius Cicero (January 3, 106 BC - December 7, 43 BC) was an orator, statesman, political theorist, lawyer and philosopher of Ancient Rome. He is considered by many to be amongst the greatest of the Latin orators and prose ...

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Nothing so cements and holds together all the parts of a society as faith or credit, which can never be kept up unless men are under some force or necessity of honestly paying what they owe to one another.

No well-informed person ever imputed inconsistency to another for changing his mind.
Great is the power, great is the authority of a senate that is unanimous in its opinions.
The mansion should not be graced by its master, the master should grace the mansion.
Confidence is that feeling by which the mind embarks in great and honorable courses with a sure hope and trust in itself.
What one has, one ought to use: and whatever he does he should do with all his might.
As fire when thrown into water is cooled down and put out, so also a false accusation when brought against a man of the purest and holiest character, boils over and is at once dissipated, and vanishes and threats of heaven and sea, himself standing unmoved.
Like associates with like.
When you are aspiring to the highest place, it is honorable to reach the second or even the third rank.
You must become an old man in good time if you wish to be an old man long.
Old age, especially an honored old age, has so great authority, that this is of more value than all the pleasures of youth.
No one is so old as to think he cannot live one more year.
Every stage of human life, except the last, is marked out by certain and defined limits; old age alone has no precise and determinate boundary.
The foolishness of old age does not characterize all who are old, but only the foolish.
Virtue is its own reward.
The sinews of war, a limitless supply of money.
A person who is wise does nothing against their will, nothing with sighing or under coercion.
There is wickedness in the intention of wickedness, even though it be not perpetrated in the act.
Nothing contributes to the entertainment of the reader more, than the change of times and the vicissitudes of fortune.
True law is right reason in agreement with nature; it is of universal application, unchanging and everlasting; it summons to duty by its commands, and averts from wrong-doing by its prohibitions. And it does not lay its commands or prohibitions upon good men in vain, though neither have any effect on the wicked. It is a sin to try to to [sic] alter this law, nor is it allowable to attempt to repeal any part of it, and it is impossible to abolish it entirely. We cannot be freed from its obligations by senate or people, and we need not look outside ourselves for an expounder or interpreter of it. And there will not be different laws at Rome and at Athens, or different laws now and in the future, but one eternal and unchangeable law will be valid for all nations and all times, and there will be one master and ruler, that is, God, over us all, for he is the author of this law, its promulgator, and its enforcing judge. Whoever is disobedient is fleeing from himself and denying his human nature, and by reason of this very fact he will suffer the worst penalties, even if he escapes what is commonly considered punishment.
As I give thought to the matter, I find four causes for the apparent misery of old age; first, it withdraws us from active accomplishments; second, it renders the body less powerful; third, it deprives us of almost all forms of enjoyment; fourth, it stands not far from death.
I am a Roman citizen.
For of all gainful professions, nothing is better, nothing more pleasing, nothing more delightful, nothing better becomes a well-bred man than agriculture.
The administration of government, like a guardianship ought to be directed to the good of those who confer, not of those who receive the trust.