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He [Oliver Cromwell] in a furious manner, bid the Speaker leave his chair; told the house That they had sat lo.. - Quote

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He [Oliver Cromwell] in a furious manner, bid the Speaker leave his chair; told the house That they had sat long enough, unless they had done more good; and that it was not fit they should sit as a parliament any longer, and desired them to go away.

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Source Notes: Source: OLIVER CROMWELL, dissolving Parliament, April 20, 1653, as reported by Bulstrode Whitlocke.Cobbetts Parliamentary History of England, from the Norman Conquest, in 1066, to the Year 1803, vol. 3, col. 1383 .There is no official version of this speech because the journal entry was expunged by order of Parliament, January 7, 1659. The version most often quoted is that of Thomas Carlyle, who combined three original sources, including Whitlocke, to obtain an authentic, moderately conceivable account: You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing lately. Depart, I say; and let us have done with you. In the name of God,go!Thomas Carlyle, Oliver Cromwells Letters and Speeches, vol. 3, part 7, pp. 3435 .On May 7, 1940, Leopold Amery quoted the Carlyle version in the House of Commons, urging Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain to resign.Winston Churchill, The Gathering Storm , p. 659 .Senator George J. Mitchell quoted the Carlyle version on December 23, 1982.Congressional Record, vol. 128, no. 17, p. S16068 .

A bit about Oliver Cromwell ...

Oliver Cromwell (April 25, 1599 September 3, 1658) was an English military leader and politician. After leading the overthrow of the British monarchy, he ruled England, Scotland, and Ireland as Lord Protector, from December 16, 1653 until his death, which is believed to have been by either malaria or poisoning. After his burial he was exhumed and hanged, drawn and quartered, which was the traditional punishment for treason in England.

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