Quotes for Events - Father's Day

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Quotes for Father's Day.

It is a wise father that knows his own child.

Only a dad but he gives his all To smooth the way for his children small, Doing with courage stern and grim, The deeds that his father did for him, This is the line that for him I pen, Only a dad, but the best of men.
One father is more than a hundred schoolmasters.
One father is enough to governe one hundred sons, but not a hundred sons one father.
A wise son maketh a glad father; but a foolish son is the heaviness of his mother.
The glory of a man is from the honour of his father.
The father's obligations to his son are: he must circumcise him, redeem him, teach him Torah, teach him a trade, and help him secure a wife.--some also say, teach him to swim.
Why, 'tis a happy thing To be the father unto many sons.
Fathers that wear rags Do make their children blind, But fathers that bear bags Shall see their children kind.
Greatness of name in the father ofttimes helps not forth but overwhelms the son; they stand too near one another, the shadow kills the growth. So much, that we see the grandchild come more and oftener to be heir.
It is impossible to please all the world and one's father.
As for myself, I know what trouble I've given you at various times through my peculiarities, and as my own boys grow up, I shall learn more and more of the kind of trial you had to overcome in superintending the development of a creature different from yourself, for whom you felt responsible.
A Father's Day would call attention to such constructive teachings from the pulpit as would naturally point out: The father's place in the home. The training of children. The safeguarding of the marriage tie. The protection of womanhood and childhood. The meaning of this, whether in the light of religion or of patriotism is so apparent as to need no argument in behalf of such a day.
For the great heart of him hurries At the call of help from you. He will help us mend the broken Heart of ours or hope or toy, And the tale may bide unspoken--For he used to be a boy.
Father's Day was comical in part because fathers seemed so out of place or uncomfortable in this holiday world of sentimental gifts and domestic flattery. The "little remembrances" of flowers, cards, and novelties became funny when showered on Father; they opened up a line of humor that played on the gendered incongruities of holiday gift giving. As one editorial writer on the holiday put the matter in 1925, fathers have "no talent for the fribbles and frabbles and furbelows with which Mother signalizes well-being."
What Mother's Day did for the florist industry, Father's Day did for the necktie industry. Along with tobacco, shirts, and other typically masculine gifts, neckties appeared on the earliest Father's Day greeting cards, and retailers wasted no time in turning the holiday to their advantage.
That is natural enough when nobody has had fathers they begin to long for them and then when everybody has had fathers they begin to long to do without them.