Quotes for Events - Awards, Rewards, and Congratulation

Share Your Quotes Join Us Inspire & Move Your Friends

How do you feel today?    I feel ...

Quotes for awards, rewards, and congratulation. Special accomplishments deserve special attention. From getting an A on a report card, to losing 20 pounds, to finishing a 5K run, to hitting par for the first time, there's nothing like getting a pat on the back to spur one to greater heights. Let your special someone know how proud you are of their accomplishments.

The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.

Good and evil, reward and punishment, are the only motives to a rational creature: these are the spur and reins whereby all mankind are set on work, and guided.
Certainly, Fame is like a river, that beareth up things light and swollen and drowns things weighty and solid. But if persons of quality and judgement concur, then it is, (as the Scripture saith) Nomen bonum instar unguenti fragrantis : it filleth all round about, and will not easily away. For the odours of ointments are more durable than those of flowers.
I find the pain of a little censure, even when it is unfounded, is more acute than the pleasure of much praise.
To refuse awards … is another way of accepting them with more noise than is normal.
Whoever is a good man only because people will know it, and because they will esteem him better for it after knowing it, whoever will do well only on condition that his virtue will come to the knowledge of men, that man is not one from whom one can derive much service.
It might perhaps be excusable for a painter or another artisan, or even for a rhetorician or a grammarian, to toil to acquire a name by his works; but the actions of virtue are too noble in themselves to seek any other reward than from their own worth, and especially to seek it in the vanity of human judgments.
The winning of honour is but the revealing of a man's virtue and worth without disadvantage. For some in their actions do woo and affect honour and reputation, which sort of men are commonly much talked of, but inwardly little admired. And some, contrariwise, darken their virtue in the show of it, so as they be undervalued in opinion. . . . Envy, which is the canker of honour, is best extinguished by declaring a man's self in his ends, rather to seek merit than fame, and by attributing a man's successes, rather to divine Providence and felicity, than to his own virtue or policy.
The reward of labor is life. Is that not enough? . . . If you are going to ask to be paid for the pleasure of creation, which is what excellence in work means, the next thing we shall hear of will be a bill sent in for the begetting of children.
How many things by season season'd are To their right praise and true perfection!