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Our expenses are all for conformity.

A man must consider what a rich realm he abdicates when he becomes a conformist.
The best things and best people rise out of their separateness; I'm against a homogenized society because I want the cream to rise.
It is the individual only who is timeless. Societies, cultures, and civilizations --past and present --are often incomprehensible to outsiders, but the individual's hungers, anxieties, dreams, and preoccupations have remained unchanged through the millennia.
The great challenge which faces us is to assure that, in our society of big-ness, we do not strangle the voice of creativity, that the rules of the game do not come to overshadow its purpose, that the grand orchestration of society leaves ample room for the man who marches to the music of another drummer.
Writers write to influence their readers, their preachers, their auditors, but always, at bottom, to be more themselves.
Resistance to the organized mass can be effected only by the man who is as well organized in his individuality as the mass itself.
Except in a few well-publicized instances (enough to lend credence to the iconography painted on the walls of the media), the rigorous practice of rugged individualism usually leads to poverty, ostracism and disgrace. The rugged individualist is too often mistaken for the misfit, the maverick, the spoilsport, the sore thumb.
That so few now dare to be eccentric, marks the chief danger of the time.
Never permit a dichotomy to rule your life, a dichotomy in which you hate what you do so you can have pleasure in your spare time. Look for a situation in which your work will give you as much happiness as your spare time.
A happy life is one which is in accordance with its own nature.
Every single one of us can do things that no one else can do -- can love things that no one else can love. We are like violins. We can be used for doorstops, or we can make music. You know what to do.
My great mistake, the fault for which I can't forgive myself, is that one day I ceased my obstinate pursuit of my own individuality.
Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.
The two most common elements in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity.
Words are alive; cut them and they bleed.
Genius may have its limitations, but stupidity is not thus handicapped.
One of the annoying things about believing in free will and individual responsibility is the difficulty of finding somebody to blame your problems on. And when you do find somebody, it's remarkable how often his picture turns up on your driver's license.
The imagination is the spur of delights... all depends upon it, it is the mainspring of everything; now, is it not by means of the imagination one knows joy? Is it not of the imagination that the sharpest pleasures arise?
All meaningful and lasting change starts first in your imagination and then works its way out. Imagination is more important than knowledge.
You have to accept the fact that part of the sizzle of sex comes from the danger of sex. You can be overpowered.
To a historian libraries are food, shelter, and even muse. They are of two kinds: the library of published material, books, pamphlets, periodicals, and the archive of unpublished papers and documents.
My library was dukedom large enough.
What do we, as a nation, care about books? How much do you think we spend altogether on our libraries, public or private, as compared with what we spend on our horses?
The words of the world want to make sentences.
A library is but the soul's burying ground. It is a land of shadows.
Good as it is to inherit a library, it is better to collect one.
The true university of these days is a collection of books.
A library is the delivery room for the birth of ideas, a place where history comes to life.
A man should keep his little brain attic stocked with all the furniture that he is likely to use, and the rest he can put away in the lumber room of his library, where he can get it if he wants it.
A man's library is a sort of harem.
Be a little careful about your library. Do you foresee what you will do with it? Very little to be sure. But the real question is, What it will do with you? You will come here and get books that will open your eyes, and your ears, and your curiosity, and turn you inside out or outside in.
Meek young men grow up in libraries, believing it their duty to accept the views which Cicero, which Locke, which Bacon, have given, forgetful that Cicero, Locke, and Bacon were only young men in libraries, when they wrote these books. Hence, instead of Man Thinking, we have the book-worm.
Your library is your paradise.
Libraries are reservoirs of strength, grace and wit, reminders of order, calm and continuity, lakes of mental energy, neither warm nor cold, light nor dark. The pleasure they give is steady, unorgastic, reliable, deep and long-lasting. In any library in the world, I am at home, unselfconscious, still and absorbed.
A library implies an act of faith.
The great British Library --an immense collection of volumes of all ages and languages, many of which are now forgotten, and most of which are seldom read: one of these sequestered pools of obsolete literature to which modern authors repair, and draw buckets full of classic lore, or pure English, undefiled wherewith to swell their own scanty rills of thought.
No place affords a more striking conviction of the vanity of human hopes than a public library.
It is almost everywhere the case that soon after it is begotten the greater part of human wisdom is laid to rest in repositories.
What is more important in a library than anything else -- than everything else -- is the fact that it exists.
Some on commission, some for the love of learning, some because they have nothing better to do or because they hope these walls of books will deaden the drumming of the demon in their ears.
My alma mater was books, a good library. I could spend the rest of my life reading, just satisfying my curiosity.
The library is the temple of learning, and learning has liberated more people than all the wars in history.
Madam, a circulating library in a town is as an evergreen tree of diabolical knowledge; it blossoms through the year. And depend on it that they who are so fond of handling the leaves, will long for the fruit at last.
I go into my library, and all history unrolls before me. I breathe the morning air of the world while the scent of Eden's roses yet lingered in it, while it vibrated only to the world's first brood of nightingales, and to the laugh of Eve. I see the pyramids building; I hear the shoutings of the armies of Alexander.
An hour spent in the library is worth a month in the laboratory.
Here Greek and Roman find themselves alive along these crowded shelves; and Shakespeare treads again his stage, and Chaucer paints anew his age.
He who is not contented with what he has, would not be contented with what he would like to have.
In that sweet mood when pleasant thoughts bring sad thoughts to the mind.
Whenever, at a party, I have been in the mood to study fools, I have always looked for a great beauty: they always gather round her like flies around a fruit stall.
Certain brief sentences are peerless in their ability to give one the feeling that nothing remains to be said.
I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.
I was afraid that by observing objects with my eyes and trying to comprehend them with each of my other senses I might blind my soul altogether.
To find yourself, think for yourself.
One thing only I know, and that is that I know nothing.
A faithful friend is a strong defense: and he that hath found one hath found a treasure.
Our friends interpret the world and ourselves to us, if we take them tenderly and truly.
Some friends play at friendship, but a true friend sticks closer than one's nearest kin. [Proverbs 18:24]
Forsake not an old friend, for the new is not comparable unto him. A new friend is as new wine: when it is old thou shalt drink it with pleasure.
One friend in a lifetime is much, two are many, three are hardly possible. Friendship needs a certain parallelism of life, a community of thought, a rivalry of aim.
Keep a fair-sized cemetery in your back yard, in which to bury the faults of your friends.
When friendship disappears then there is a space left open to that awful loneliness of the outside world which is like the cold space between the planets. It is an air in which men perish utterly.
Friends, both the imaginary ones you build for yourself out of phrases taken from a living writer, or real ones from college, and relatives, despite all the waste of ceremony and fakery and the fact that out of an hour of conversation you may have only five minutes in which the old entente reappears, are the only real means for foreign ideas to enter your brain.
The worst solitude is to have no real friendships.
Friendship is essentially a partnership.
Your friends will know you better in the first minute they meet you than your acquaintances will know you in a thousand years.
A true friend is one soul in two bodies.
I keep my friends as misers do their treasure, because, of all the things granted us by wisdom, none is greater or better than friendship.
Stay is a charming word in a friend's vocabulary.
A friend loveth at all times. [Proverbs 17:17]
We cannot tell the precise moment when friendship is formed. As in filling a vessel drop by drop, there is at last a drop which makes it run over. So in a series of kindness there is, at last, one which makes the heart run over.
I have always laid it down as a maxim --and found it justified by experience --that a man and a woman make far better friendships than can exist between two of the same sex --but then with the condition that they never have made or are to make love to each other.
If we would build on a sure foundation in friendship, we must love friends for their sake rather than for our own.
A mirror reflects a man's face, but what he is really like is shown by the kind of friends he chooses. [Proverbs 27:19]
Love is like the wild rose-briar; Friendship like the holly-tree. The holly is dark when the rose-briar blooms, but which will bloom most constantly?
Only solitary men know the full joys of friendship. Others have their family --but to a solitary and an exile his friends are everything.
To come to be you must have a vision of Being, a Dream, a Purpose, a Principle. You will become what your vision is.
Three levels of organizational vision: 1. The Do-able 2. The Conceivable 3. The Previously Unthinkable.
We need to learn to set our course by the stars, not by the lights of every passing ship.
Far away there in the sunshine are my highest aspirations. I may not reach them, but I can look up and see their beauty, believe in them, and try to follow where they lead.
As a man is, so he sees. As the eye is formed, such are its powers.
Make no little plans. They have no magic to stir men's blood and probably themselves will not be realized. Make big plans. Aim high in hope and work. Remembering that a noble, logical diagram once recorded will not die.
The world values the seer above all men, and has always done so. Nay, it values all men in proportion as they partake of the character of seers. The Elgin Marbles and a decision of John Marshall are valued for the same reason. What we feel in them is a painstaking submission to facts beyond the author's control, and to ideas imposed upon him by his vision. So with Beethoven's Symphonies, with Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations -- with any conceivable output of the human mind of which you approve. You love them because you say, These things were not made, they were seen.
Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
We need to give ourselves permission to act out our dreams and visions, not look for more sensations, more phenomena, but live our strongest dreams -- even if it takes a lifetime.
Cherish you visions and your dreams as they are the children of your soul; the blue prints of your ultimate achievements.
Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakens.
If you would hit the mark, you must aim a little above it; Every arrow that flies feels the attraction of earth.
Only eyes washed by tears can see clearly.
We lift ourselves by our thought. We climb upon our vision of ourselves. If you want to enlarge your life, you must first enlarge your thought of it and of yourself. Hold the ideal of yourself as you long to be, always everywhere.
There are lone figures armed only with ideas, sometimes with just one idea, who blast away whole epochs in which we are enwrapped like mummies. Some are powerful enough to resurrect the dead. Some steal on us unawares and put a spell over us which it takes centuries to throw off. Some put a curse on us, for our stupidity and inertia, and then it seems as if God himself were unable to lift it.
In a narrow circle the mind grows narrow. The more one expands, the larger their aims.
Some men see things as they are and say, Why? I of dream things that never were, and say, Why not?
Reach high, for stars lie hidden in your soul. Dream deep, for every dream precedes the goal.
Every age needs men who will redeem the time by living with a vision of the things that are to be.
Vision is the art of seeing things invisible.
I would give all the wealth of the world, and all the deeds of all the heroes, for one true vision.
The ideal life is in our blood and never will be still. Sad will be the day for any man when he becomes contented with the thoughts he is thinking and the deeds he is doing -- where there is not forever beating at the doors of his soul some great desire to do something larger; which he knows he was meant and made to do.
Dwell in though upon the Grandest, And the Grandest you shall see; Fix your mind upon the Highest, And the Highest you shall be.
Do not follow where the path may lead. Go, instead, where there is no path and leave a trail.
Every secret of a writer's soul, every experience of his life, every quality of his mind is written large in his works.
A writer and nothing else; a man alone in a room with the English language, trying to get human feelings right.
His style is chaos illumined by flashes of lightning. As a writer he has mastered everything except language.
Most writers regard the truth as their most valuable possession, and therefore are economical in its use.
The responsibility of a writer is to excavate the experience of the people who produced him.
Some writers confuse authenticity, which they ought always to aim at, with originality, which they should never bother about.
So much of our time is spent in preparation, so much in routine, and so much in retrospect, that the amount of each person's genius is confined to a very few hours.
One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive hour. Write it on your heart that every day is the best day in the year. No man has learned anything rightly, until he knows that every day is Doomsday.
You must live in the present, launch yourself on every wave, find your eternity in each moment.
Do what you love. Know you own bone; gnaw at it, bury it, unearth it, and gnaw it still.
Society often forgives the criminal; it never forgives the dreamer.
How beautiful is youth! how bright it gleams with its illusions, aspirations, dreams! Book of Beginnings, Story without End, Each maid a heroine, and each man a friend!
A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.
Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The trouble-makers. The round heads in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status-quo. You can quote them. Disagree with them. Glorify, or vilify them. But the only thing you can't do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world
Are the ones who do.
A genius is one who can do anything except make a living.
It takes people a long time to learn the difference between talent and genius, especially ambitious young men and women.
We know that the nature of genius is to provide idiots with ideas twenty years later.
There is no great genius without a mixture of madness.
One is not born a genius, one becomes a genius.
Genius unexerted is no more genius than a bushel of acorns is a forest of oaks.
Men of genius are not quick judges of character. Deep thinking and high imagining blunt that trivial instinct by which you and I size people up.
Genius makes its observations in short-hand; talent writes them out at length.
What is genius but the power of expressing a new individuality?
Since when was genius found respectable?
Every man who observes vigilantly and resolves steadfastly grows unconsciously into genius.
A genius can never expect to have a good time anywhere, if he is a genuine article, but America is about the last place in which life will be endurable at all for an inspired writer of any kind.
I really cannot know whether I am or am not the Genius you are pleased to call me, but I am very willing to put up with the mistake, if it be one. It is a title dearly enough bought by most men, to render it endurable, even when not quite clearly made out, which it never can be till the Posterity, whose decisions are merely dreams to ourselves, has sanctioned or denied it, while it can touch us no further.
Genius is an infinite capacity for taking pains.
Passion holds up the bottom of the universe and genius paints up its roof.
The eye of genius has always a plaintive expression, and its natural language is pathos.
True genius resides in the capacity for evaluation of uncertain, hazardous, and conflicting information.
As it must not, so genius cannot be lawless; for it is even that constitutes its genius -- the power of acting creatively under laws of its own origination.
You know lots of criticism is written by characters who are very academic and think it is a sign you are worthless if you make jokes or kid or even clown. I wouldn't kid Our Lord if he was on the cross. But I would attempt a joke with him if I ran into him chasing the money changers out of the temple.
My attitude toward punctuation is that it ought to be as conventional as possible. The game of golf would lose a good deal if croquet mallets and billiard cues were allowed on the putting green. You ought to be able to show that you can do it a good deal better than anyone else with the regular tools before you have a license to bring in your own improvements.
Eschew the monumental. Shun the Epic. All the guys who can paint great big pictures can paint great small ones.
As you get older it is harder to have heroes, but it is sort of necessary.
When human power becomes so great and original that we can account for it only as a kind of divine imagination, we call it genius.
Men of lofty genius when they are doing the least work are most active.
Genius, like truth, has a shabby and neglected mien.
Genius is present in every age, but the men carrying it within them remain benumbed unless extraordinary events occur to heat up and melt the mass so that it flows forth.
Patience is a necessary ingredient of genius.
But then they danced down the street like dingledodies, and I shambled after as I've been doing all my life after people who interest me, because the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!
Not to have control over the senses is like sailing in a rudderless ship, bound to break to pieces on coming in contact with the very first rock.
I am always with myself and it is I who am my tormentor.
Love is a great beautifier.
People have many different kinds of pleasure. The real one is that for which they will forsake the others.
Darkness can not drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.
Envy is more irreconcilable than hatred.
Hatred paralyzes life; love releases it. Hatred confuses life; love harmonizes it. Hatred darkens life; love illuminates it.
It is not the critic who counts. Not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause. Who, at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.

But wait... my book has more:

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