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I am a dreamer of words, of written words. I think I am reading; a word stops me. I leave the page. The syllables of the word begin to move around. Stressed accents begin to invert. The word abandons its meaning like an overload which is too heavy and prevents dreaming. Then words take on other meanings as if they had the right to be young. And the words wander away, looking in the nooks and crannies of vocabulary for new company, bad company.

We participate in tragedy. At comedy we only look.
Some editors are failed writers, but so are most writers.
The writer has a grudge against society, which he documents with accounts of unsatisfying sex, unrealized ambition, unmitigated loneliness, and a sense of local and global distress. The square, overpopulation, the bourgeois, the bomb and the cocktail party are variously identified as sources of the grudge. There follows a little obscenity here, a dash of philosophy there, considerable whining overall, and a modern satirical novel is born.
Men are motivated and empowered when they feel needed. Women are motivated and empowered when they feel cherished.
The modern picture of the artist began to form: The poor, but free spirit, plebeian but aspiring only to be classless, to cut himself forever free from the bonds of the greedy bourgeoisie, to be whatever the fat burghers feared most, to cross the line wherever they drew it, to look at the world in a way they couldn't see, to be high, live low, stay young forever -- in short, to be the bohemian.
Remember tonight.. for it is the beginning of always.
Old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read.
Love is as much of an object as an obsession, everybody wants it, everybody seeks it, but few ever achieve it, those who do will cherish it, be lost in it, and among all, never... never forget it.
True love is like ghosts, which everybody talks about and few have seen.
Love is never lost. If not reciprocated, it will flow back and soften and purify the heart.
Go to the truth beyond the mind. Love is the bridge.
There is no living with thee, nor without thee.
Love is made by two people, in different kinds of solitude. It can be in a crowd, but in an oblivious crowd.
Love is the beauty of the soul.
There is nothing heavier than compassion. Not even one's own pain weighs so heavy as the pain one feels with someone, for someone, a pain intensified by the imagination and prolonged by a hundred echoes.
People are always shouting they want to create a better future. It's not true. The future is an apathetic void of no interest to anyone. The past is full of life, eager to irritate us, provoke and insult us, tempt us to destroy or repaint it. The only reason people want to be masters of the future is to change the past.
Few are sufficiently sensible of the importance of that economy in reading which selects, almost exclusively, the very first order of books. Why, except for some special reason, read an inferior book, at the very time you might be reading one of the highest order?
How many a man has dated a new era in his life from the reading of a book! The book exists for us, perchance, that will explain our miracles and reveal new ones. The at present unutterable things we may find somewhere uttered.
A real book is not one that we read, but one that reads us.
Getting to know someone is like investigating a crime scene where the culprit is constantly allowed to rearrange the evidence.
Star friendship.— We were friends and have become estranged. But this was right, and we do not want to conceal and obscure it from ourselves as if we had reason to feel ashamed. We are two ships each of which has its goal and course; our paths may cross and we may celebrate a feast together, as we did—and then the good ships rested so quietly in one harbor and one sunshine that it may have looked as if they had reached their goal and as if they had one goal. But then the almighty force of our tasks drove us apart again into different seas and sunny zones, and perhaps we shall never see one another again,—perhaps we shall meet again but fail to recognize each other: our exposure to different seas and suns has changed us! That we have to become estranged is the law above us: by the same token we should also become more venerable for each other! And thus the memory of our former friendship should become more sacred! There is probably a tremendous but invisible stellar orbit in which our very different ways and goals may be included as small parts of this path,—let us rise up to this thought! But our life is too short and our power of vision too small for us to be more than friends in the sense of this sublime possibility.— Let us then believe in our star friendship even if we should be compelled to be earth enemies.
Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass on a summer day listening to the murmur of water, or watching the clouds float across the sky, is hardly a waste of time.
No woman marries for money; they are all clever enough, before marrying a millionaire, to fall in love with him first.
Great things are not done by impulse, but by a series of small things brought together.
For purposes of action nothing is more useful than narrowness of thought combined with energy of will.
To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment.
Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing.
We do not write in order to be understood; we write in order to understand.
I always write a good first line, but I have trouble in writing the others.
Only amateurs say that they write for their own amusement. Writing is not an amusing occupation. It is a combination of ditch-digging, mountain-climbing, treadmill and childbirth. Writing may be interesting, absorbing, exhilarating, racking, relieving. But amusing? Never!
The best emotions to write out of are anger and fear or dread. The least energizing emotion to write out of is admiration. It is very difficult to write out of because the basic feeling that goes with admiration is a passive contemplative mood.
I have tried simply to write the best I can. Sometimes I have good luck and write better than I can.
No one can write a best seller by trying to. He must write with complete sincerity; the clich?s that make you laugh, the hackneyed characters, the well-worn situations, the commonplace story that excites your derision, seem neither hackneyed, well worn nor commonplace to him. The conclusion is obvious: you cannot write anything that will convince unless you are yourself convinced. The best seller sells because he writes with his heart's blood.
The best thinking has been done in solitude.
There is a fellowship more quiet even than solitude, and which, rightly understood, is solitude made perfect.
Solitude, though it may be silent as light, is like light, the mightiest of agencies; for solitude is essential to man. All men come into this world alone and leave it alone.
It is easy in the world to live after the world's opinions; it is easy in solitude to live after your own; but the great man is he who in the midst of the crowd keeps with perfect sweetness the independence of solitude.
The fool needs company, the wise solitude.
If you would live innocently, seek solitude.
Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god.
The mark of solitude is silence, as speech is the mark of community. Silence and speech have the same inner correspondence and difference as do solitude and community. One does not exist without the other. Right speech comes out of silence, and right silence comes out of speech.
The right to be alone -- the most comprehensive of rights, and the right most valued by civilized man.
Get away from the crowd when you can. Keep yourself to yourself, if only for a few hours daily.
History shows that the majority of people that have done anything great have passed their youth in seclusion.
If you are afraid of loneliness, don't marry.
Solitary trees, if they grow at all, grow strong.
Alone, even doing nothing, you do not waste your time. You do, almost always, in company. No encounter with yourself can be altogether sterile: Something necessarily emerges, even if only the hope of some day meeting yourself again.
I live in that solitude which is painful in youth, but delicious in the years of maturity.
Conversation enriches the understanding; but solitude is the school of genius.
By all means use sometimes to be alone. Salute thyself: see what thy soul doth wear. Dare to look in thy chest; for 'Tis thine own: And tumble up and down what thou findst there. Who cannot rest till he good fellows find, he breaks up house, turns out of doors his mind.
Violent passions are formed in solitude. In the busy world no object has time to make a deep impression.
The more powerful and original a mind, the more it will incline towards the religion of solitude.
Though the most beautiful creature were waiting for me at the end of a journey or a walk; though the carpet were of silk, the curtains of the morning clouds; the chairs and sofa stuffed with cygnet's down; the food manna, the wine beyond claret, the window opening on Winander Mere, I should not feel --or rather my happiness would not be so fine, as my solitude is sublime.
The thoughtful soul to solitude retires.
There is convincing evidence that the search for solitude is not a luxury but a biological need. Just as humans posses a herding instinct that keeps us close to others most of the time, we also have a conflicting drive to seek out solitude. If the distance between ourselves and others becomes too great, we experience isolation and alienation, yet if the proximity to others becomes too close, we feel smothered and trapped.
A solitude is the audience-chamber of God.
Solitude is as needed to the imagination as society is wholesome to the character.
Solitude gives birth to the original in us, to beauty unfamiliar and perilous- to poetry. But also, it gives birth to the opposite: to the perverse, the illicit, the absurd.
Well has he lived who has lived well in obscurity.
One hour of thoughtful solitude may nerve the heart for days of conflict -- girding up its armor to meet the most insidious foe.
Shakespeare, Leonardo Da Vinci, Benjamin Franklin, and Lincoln never saw a movie, heard a radio, or looked at a TV They had loneliness and knew what to do with it. They were not afraid of being lonely because they knew that was when the creative mood in them would mark.
A man can be himself only so long as he is alone.
Solitude cherishes great virtues and destroys little ones.
In solitude the mind gains strength and learns to lean upon itself.
I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of time. To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome and dissipating. I love to be alone, I never found the companionable as solitude.
If we will be quiet and ready enough, we shall find compensation in every disappointment.
Solitude is the despair of fools, the torment of the wicked, and the joy of the good.
When from our better selves we have too long been parted by the hurrying world, and droop. Sick of its business, of its pleasures tired, how gracious, how benign in solitude.
Loneliness is the poverty of self; solitude is the richness of self.
Faith is deliberate confidence in the character of God whose ways you may not understand at the time.
They do not love that do not show their love. The course of true love never did run smooth. Love is a familiar. Love is a devil. There is no evil angel but Love.
Two things reduce prejudice: education and laughter.
Almost all of our sorrows spring out of our relations with other people.
The only way of knowing a person is to love them without hope.
Show me the books he loves and I shall know the man far better than through mortal friends.
When a girl ceases to blush, she has lost the most powerful charm of her beauty.
There's a great power in words, if you don't hitch too many of them together.
It wasn't by accident that the Gettysburg address was so short. The laws of prose writing are as immutable as those of flight, of mathematics, of physics.
It is my ambition to say in ten sentences; what others say in a whole book.
If you would be pungent, be brief; for it is with words as with sunbeams -- the more they are condensed, the deeper they burn.
A man should conceive of a legitimate purpose in his heart, and set out to accomplish it. He should make this purpose the centralizing point of his thoughts. It may take the form of a spiritual ideal, or it may be a worldly object, according to his nature at the time being; but whichever it is, he should steadily focus his thought forces upon the object which he has set before him. He should make this purpose his supreme duty, and should devote himself to its attainment, not allowing his thoughts to wander away into ephemeral fancies, longings, and imaginings. This is the royal road to self-control and true concentration of thought. Even if he fails again and again to accomplish his purpose (as he necessarily must until weakness is overcome), the strength of character gained will be the measure of his true success, and this will form a new starting point for future power and triumph.
Never be afraid to treat the path alone. Know which is your path and follow it wherever it may lead you; do not feel you have to follow in someone else's footsteps.
Your work is to discover your work and then with all your heart to give yourself to it.
Call it a clan, call it a network, call it a tribe, call it a family: Whatever you call it, whoever you are, you need one.
Into each life some rain must fall, some days be dark and dreary.
Know how sublime a thing it is to suffer and be strong.
If we could read the secret history of our enemies, we would find in each person's life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostility.
Therefore trust to thy heart, and to what the world calls illusions.
The secret anniversaries of the heart.
It is difficult to know at what moment love begins; it is less difficult to know that it has begun.
It is foolish to pretend that one is fully recovered from a disappointed passion. Such wounds always leave a scar.
It is curious to note the old sea-margins of human thought! Each subsiding century reveals some new mystery; we build where monsters used to hide themselves.
Write on your doors the saying wise and old. Be bold! and everywhere -- Be bold; Be not too bold! Yet better the excess Than the defect; better the more than less sustaineth him and the steadiness of his mind beareth him out.
Change is the end result of all true learning. Change involves three things: First, a dissatisfaction with self -- a felt void or need; second, a decision to change to fill the void or need; and third, a conscious dedication to the process of growth and change -- the willful act of making the change, doing something.
Spirit of place! It is for this we travel, to surprise its subtlety; and where it is a strong and dominant angel, that place, seen once, abides entire in the memory with all its own accidents, its habits, its breath, its name.
There is simply no dignified way for a woman to live alone. Oh, she can get along financially perhaps (though not nearly as well as a man), but emotionally she is never left in peace. Her friends, her family, her fellow workers never let her forget that her husbandlessness, her childlessness -- her selfishness, in short -- is a reproach to the American way of life.
If ever a man and his wife, or a man and his mistress, who pass nights as well as days together, absolutely lay aside all good breeding, their intimacy will soon degenerate into a coarse familiarity, infallibly productive of contempt or disgust.
Happiness is when what you think, what you say, and what you do are in harmony.
The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.
Who knows what true loneliness is -- not the conventional word, but the naked terror? To the lonely themselves it wears a mask. The most miserable outcast hugs some memory or some illusion. Now and then a fatal conjunction of events may lift the veil for an instant. For an instant only. No human being could bear a steady view of moral solitude without going mad.
Dream lofty dreams, and as you dream, so shall you become. Your vision is the promise of what you shall one day be; your ideal is the prophecy of what you shall at last unveil.
If a little dreaming is dangerous, the cure for it is not to dream less but to dream more, to dream all the time.
Our dreams drench us in senses, and senses steps us again in dreams.
Often the test of courage is not to die but to live.
It is easy to fly into a passion... anybody can do that, but to be angry with the right person to the right extent and at the right time and in the right way that is not easy.
Nothing splendid has ever been achieved except by those who dared believe that something inside them was superior to circumstance.
The more thou dost advance, the more thy feet pitfalls will meet. The Path that leadeth on is lighted by one fire -- the light of daring burning in the heart. The more one dares, the more he shall obtain. The more he fears, the more that light shall pale
It requires more courage to suffer than to die.
The world's male chivalry has perished out, but women are knights-errant to the last; and, if Cervantes had been greater still, he had made his Don a Donna.
Most of us have far more courage than we ever dreamed we possessed.
Courage is not the absence of fear, but rather the judgment that something else is more important than fear.
I still understand a few words in life, but I no longer think they make a sentence.
Man know much more than he understands.
To understand is to perceive patterns.
If you want to understand today, you have to search yesterday.
The key to why things change is the key to everything.
No person was every rightly understood until they had been first regarded with a certain feeling, not of tolerance, but of sympathy.
If you do not understand a man you cannot crush him. And if you do understand him, very probably you will not.
The fact that you are willing to say, I do not understand, and it is fine, is the greatest understanding you could exhibit.
No man thoroughly understands a truth until he has contended against it.
In youth we learn; in age we understand.
The guru, if he is gifted, reads the story as any bilingual person might. He does not translate-he understands.
When we talk about understanding, surely it takes place only when the mind listens completely -- the mind being your heart, your nerves, your ears- when you give your whole attention to it.
The power of intuitive understanding will protect you from harm until the end of your days.
Understanding can overcome any situation, however mysterious or insurmountable it may appear to be.
If you understand, things are just as they are; if you do not understand, things are just as they are.
We shall see but little way if we require to understand what we see. How few things can a man measure with the tape of his understanding! How many greater things might he be seeing in the meanwhile!
Everything that I understand, I understand only because I love.
Many a man would rather you heard his story than granted his request.
In a completely sane world, madness is the only freedom!
The usefulness of madmen is famous: they demonstrate society's logic flagrantly carried out down to its last scrimshaw scrap.
Madness is tonic and invigorating. It makes the sane more sane. The only ones who are unable to profit by it are the insane.
And what is an authentic madman? It is a man who preferred to become mad, in the socially accepted sense of the word, rather than forfeit a certain superior idea of human honor. So society has strangled in its asylums all those it wanted to get rid of or protect itself from, because they refused to become its accomplices in certain great nastinesses. For a madman is also a man whom society did not want to hear and whom it wanted to prevent from uttering certain intolerable truths.
No great genius has ever existed without some touch of madness.
Men are mad most of their lives; few live sane, fewer die so. The acts of people are baffling unless we realize that their wits are disordered. Man is driven to justice by his lunacy.
In this century the writer has carried on a conversation with madness. We might almost say of the twentieth-century writer that he aspires to madness. Some have made it, of course, and they hold special places in our regard. To a writer, madness is a final distillation of self, a final editing down. It's the drowning out of false voices.
Much Madness is divinest Sense -- to a discerning Eye -- much Sense -- the starkest Madness --
Perhaps he was a bit different from other people, but what really sympathetic person is not a little mad?
Madness need not be all breakdown. It may also be break-through. It is potential liberation and renewal as well as enslavement and existential death.
The experience and behavior that gets labeled schizophrenic is a special strategy that a person invents in order to live in an unlivable situation.
I guess the definition of a lunatic is a man surrounded by them.
It's a question to ask ourselves if we're not mad. But who are the madmen, in God's name? Those who wonder about it, or the others? If we ever began to speak out loud, what would they do with us, tell me?
We want a few mad people now. See where the sane ones have landed us!
Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed, and in such desperate enterprises? If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured and far away. It is not important that he should mature as soon as an apple tree or an oak.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.
We would worry less about what others think of us if we realized how seldom they do.
The privilege of a lifetime is being who you are.
Losing faith in your own singularity is the start of wisdom, I suppose; also the first announcement of death.
Individuality is either the mark of genius or the reverse. Mediocrity finds safety in standardization.

But wait... my book has more:

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