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Now there is fame! Of all -- hunger, misery, the incomprehension by the public -- fame is by far the worst. It is the castigation of God by the artist. It is sad. It is true.

What is a face, really? Its own photo? Its make-up? Or is it a face as painted by such or such painter? That which is in front? Inside? Behind? And the rest? Doesn't everyone look at himself in his own particular way? Deformations simply do not exist.
Museums are just a lot of lies, and the people who make art their business are mostly imposters. We have infected the pictures in museums with all our stupidities, all our mistakes, all our poverty of spirit. We have turned them into petty and ridiculous things.
It is personality with a penny's worth of talent. Error which chances to rise above the commonplace.
Everything you can imagine is real.
To copy others is necessary, but to copy oneself is pathetic.
Never permit a dichotomy to rule your life, a dichotomy in which you hate what you do so you can have pleasure in your spare time. Look for a situation in which your work will give you as much happiness as your spare time.
The artist is a receptacle for emotions that come from all over the place: from the sky, from the earth, from a scrap of paper, from a passing shape, from a spider's web.
I have no faith in human perfectibility. I think that human exertion will have no appreciable effect upon humanity. Man is now only more active --not more happy --nor more wise, than he was 6000 years ago.
Mournful and Never-ending Remembrance.
We now demand the light artillery of the intellect; we need the curt, the condensed, the pointed, the readily diffused -- in place of the verbose, the detailed, the voluminous, the inaccessible. On the other hand, the lightness of the artillery should not degenerate into pop-gunnery -- by which term we may designate the character of the greater portion of the newspaper press -- their sole legitimate object being the discussion of ephemeral matters in an ephemeral manner.
It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic.
I cannot help fearing that men may reach a point where they look on every new theory as a danger, every innovation as a toilsome trouble, every social advance as a first step toward revolution, and that they may absolutely refuse to move at all for fear of being carried off their feet. The prospect really does frighten me that they may finally become so engrossed in a cowardly love of immediate pleasures that their interest in their own future and in that of their descendants may vanish, and that they will prefer tamely to follow the course of their destiny rather than make a sudden energetic effort necessary to set things right.
They believe that nothing will happen because they have closed their doors.
In all life one should comfort the afflicted, but verily, also, one should afflict the comfortable, and especially when they are comfortably, contentedly, even happily wrong.
With me poetry has not been a purpose, but a passion.
Were I called on to define, very briefly, the term Art, I should call it the reproduction of what the Senses perceive in Nature through the veil of the soul. The mere imitation, however accurate, of what is in Nature, entitles no man to the sacred name of Artist.
After reading all that has been written, and after thinking all that can be thought, on the topics of God and the soul, the man who has a right to say that he thinks at all, will find himself face to face with the conclusion that, on these topics, the most profound thought is that which can be the least easily distinguished from the most superficial sentiment.
Yet I am not more sure that my soul lives, than I am that perverseness is one of the primitive impulses of the human heartone of the indivisible primary faculties, or sentiments, which give direction to the character of Man.
In criticism I will be bold, and as sternly, absolutely just with friend and foe. From this purpose nothing shall turn me.
That man is not truly brave who is afraid either to seem or to be, when it suits him, a coward.
That pleasure which is at once the most pure, the most elevating and the most intense, is derived, I maintain, from the contemplation of the beautiful.
Beauty of whatever kind, in its supreme development, invariably excites the sensitive soul to tears.
I have great faith in fools; My friends call it self-confidence.
To vilify a great man is the readiest way in which a little man can himself attain greatness.
We say that the hour of death cannot be forecast, but when we say this we imagine that hour as placed in an obscure and distant future. It never occurs to us that it has any connection with the day already begun or that death could arrive this same afternoon, this afternoon which is so certain and which has every hour filled in advance.
Impelled by a state of mind which is destined not to last, we make our irrevocable decisions
If a little dreaming is dangerous, the cure for it is not to dream less but to dream more, to dream all the time.
The regularity of a habit is generally in proportion to its absurdity.
Often it is just lack of imagination that keeps a man from suffering very much.
Our intellect is not the most subtle, the most powerful, the most appropriate, instrument for revealing the truth. It is life that, little by little, example by example, permits us to see that what is most important to our heart, or to our mind, is learned not by reasoning but through other agencies. Then it is that the intellect, observing their superiority, abdicates its control to them upon reasoned grounds and agrees to become their collaborator and lackey.
Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.
Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow; Don't walk behind me, I may not lead; Walk beside me, and just be my friend.
Friendship is a pretty full-time occupation if you really are friendly with somebody. You can't have too many friends because then you're just not really friends.
Best friend, my well-spring in the wilderness!
I was nauseous and tingly all over. I was either in love or I had smallpox.
I've never been an intellectual but I have this look.
I was thrown out of N.Y.U. my freshman year for cheating on my metaphysics final. You know, I looked within the soul of the boy sitting next to me.
Love is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.
There is love of course. And then there's life, its enemy.
What the world really needs is more love and less paper work.
The motto of chivalry is also the motto of wisdom; to serve all, but love only one.
The sweetest joy, the wildest woe is love.
Love, and do what you like.
Love is the beauty of the soul.
Whereas the Greeks gave to will the boundaries of reason, we have come to put the will's impulse in the very center of reason, which has, as a result, become deadly.
Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.
A true friend is one soul in two bodies.
Friendship is composed of a single soul inhabiting two bodies.
Keep a fair-sized cemetery in your back yard, in which to bury the faults of your friends.
Being taken for granted can be a compliment. It means you've become a comfortable, trusted element in another person's life.
The rule of friendship means there should be mutual sympathy between them, each supplying what the other lacks and trying to benefit the other, always using friendly and sincere words.
A good friend who points out mistakes and imperfections and rebukes evil is to be respected as if he reveals a secret of hidden treasure.
The philosopher believes that the value of his philosophy lies in the whole, in the building: posterity discovers it in the bricks with which he built and which are then often used again for better building: in the fact, that is to say, that building can be destroyed and nonetheless possess value as material.
Everyone who has ever built anywhere a new heaven first found the power thereto in his own hell.
We would not let ourselves be burned to death for our opinions: we are not sure enough of them for that. But perhaps for the right to have our opinions and to change them.
Not when truth is dirty, but when it is shallow, does the enlightened man dislike to wade into its waters.
Necessity is not an established fact, but rather an interpretation.
Let us beware of saying there are laws in nature. There are only necessities: there is no one to command, no one to obey, no one to transgress. When you realize there are no goals or objectives, then you realize, too, that there is no chance: for only in a world of objectives does the word chance have any meaning.
Without music, life would be a mistake.
Only sick music makes money today.
Arrogance on the part of the meritorious is even more offensive to us than the arrogance of those without merit: for merit itself is offensive.
The true man wants two things: danger and play. For that reason he wants woman, as the most dangerous plaything.
The advantage of a bad memory is that one enjoys several times the same good things for the first time.
Every philosophy is the philosophy of some stage of life.
Art raises its head where creeds relax.
To give style to one's character -- a great and rare art! He exercises it who surveys all that his nature presents in strength and weakness and then moulds it to an artistic plan until everything appears as art and reason, and even the weaknesses delight the eye.
Reason is the cause of our falsification of the evidence of the senses. In so far as the senses show becoming, passing away, change, they do not lie.
He who despises himself nevertheless esteems himself as a self-despiser.
You gave him an opportunity of showing greatness of character and he did not seize it. He will never forgive you for that.
He who has a strong enough why can bear almost any how.
To forget one's purpose is the commonest form of stupidity.
Undeserved praise causes more pangs of conscience later than undeserved blame, but probably only for this reason, that our power of judgment are more completely exposed by being over praised than by being unjustly underestimated.
Not necessity, not desire --no, the love of power is the demon of men. Let them have everything --health, food, a place to live, entertainment --they are and remain unhappy and low-spirited: for the demon waits and waits and will be satisfied.
We have art in order not to die of the truth.
Art is not merely an imitation of the reality of nature, but in truth a metaphysical supplement to the reality of nature, placed alongside thereof for its conquest.
Madness is something rare in individuals -- but in groups, parties, peoples, ages it is the rule.
Love is a state in which a man sees things most decidedly as they are not.
We operate with nothing but things which do not exist, with lines, planes, bodies, atoms, divisible time, divisible space -- how should explanation even be possible when we first make everything into an image, into our own image!
Man is no longer an artist, he has become a work of art.
In Heaven all the interesting people are missing.
What is good? All that heightens the feeling of power, the will to power, power itself in man.
Is man one of God's blunders or is God one of man's blunders?
I fear we are not getting rid of God because we still believe in grammar.
A matter that becomes clear ceases to concern us.
For art to exist, for any sort of aesthetic activity or perception to exist, a certain physiological precondition is indispensable: intoxication.
I assess the power of a will by how much resistance, pain, torture it endures and knows how to turn to its advantage.
The strongest knowledge (that of the total freedom of the human will) is nonetheless the poorest in successes: for it always has the strongest opponent, human vanity.
You have your way. I have my way. As for the right way, the correct way, and the only way, it does not exist.
One receives as reward for much ennui, despondency, boredom --such as a solitude without friends, books, duties, passions must bring with it --those quarter-hours of profoundest contemplation within oneself and nature. He who completely entrenches himself against boredom also entrenches himself against himself: he will never get to drink the strongest refreshing draught from his own innermost fountain.
We have no organ at all for knowledge, for truth: we know (or believe or imagine) precisely as much as may be useful in the interest of the human herd, the species: and even what is here called usefulness is in the end only a belief, something imagined and perhaps precisely that most fatal piece of stupidity by which we shall one day perish.
One often contradicts an opinion when what is uncongenial is really the tone in which it was conveyed.
The architect represents neither a Dionysian nor an Apollinian condition: here it is the mighty act of will, the will which moves mountains, the intoxication of the strong will, which demands artistic expression. The most powerful men have always inspired the architects; the architect has always been influenced by power.
I fear animals regard man as a creature of their own kind which has in a highly dangerous fashion lost its healthy animal reason -- as the mad animal, as the laughing animal, as the weeping animal, as the unhappy animal.
If you believed more in life you would fling yourself less to the moment.
One may sometimes tell a lie, but the grimace that accompanies it tells the truth.
The most common lie is that which one lies to himself; lying to others is relatively an exception.
Not by wrath does one kill, but by laughter.
The significance of language for the evolution of culture lies in this, that mankind set up in language a separate world beside the other world, a place it took to be so firmly set that, standing upon it, it could lift the rest of the world off its hinges and make itself master of it. To the extent that man has for long ages believed in the concepts and names of things as in aeternae veritates he has appropriated to himself that pride by which he raised himself above the animal: he really thought that in language he possessed knowledge of the world.
Our treasure lies in the beehive of our knowledge. We are perpetually on the way thither, being by nature winged insects and honey gatherers of the mind.
And if your friend does evil to you, say to him, I forgive you for what you did to me, but how can I forgive you for what you did to yourself?
As a man is, so he sees. As the eye is formed, such are its powers.
If only we could pull out our brain and use only our eyes.
If I have seen further... it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.
One eye sees, the other feels.
It is a terrible thing to see and have no vision.
Your vision will become clear only when you can look into your own heart. Who looks outside, dreams; who looks inside, awakens.
You have to see the pattern, understand the order and experience the vision.
Only he who can see the invisible can do the impossible.
The farther backward you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.
Of all the senses, sight must be the most delightful.
Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare.
Throughout the centuries there were men who took first steps, down new roads, armed with nothing but their own vision.
Everyone takes the limits of his own vision for the limits of the world.
Eyes lie if you ever look into them for the character of the person.
The eye is the jewel of the body.
The eyes are not responsible when the mind does the seeing.
Do everything as in the eye of another.
What we learn only through the ears makes less impression upon our minds than what is presented to the trustworthy eye.
One's eyes are what one is, one's mouth is what one becomes.
The eye of the master will do more work than both his hands.
The eyes indicate the antiquity of the soul.
When I think of vision, I have in mind the ability to see above and beyond the majority.
Vision is the art of seeing things invisible.
America is the most grandiose experiment the world has seen, but, I am afraid, it is not going to be a success.
America is a mistake, a giant mistake.
There has never been a time when you and I have not existed, nor will there be a time when we will cease to exist. As the same person inhabits the body through childhood, youth, and old age, so too at the time of death he attains another body. The wise are not deluded by these changes.
To exist is to change, to change is to mature, to mature is to go on creating oneself endlessly
Change your life today. Don't gamble on the future, act now, without delay.
The great person is ahead of their time, the smart make something out of it, and the blockhead, sets themselves against it.
Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced.
Most of us are about as eager to be changed as we were to be born, and go through our changes in a similar state of shock.
In the beautiful, man sets himself up as the standard of perfection; in select cases he worships himself in it. Man believes that the world itself is filled with beauty --he forgets that it is he who has created it. He alone has bestowed beauty upon the world --alas! only a very human, an all too human, beauty.
Nothing is beautiful, only man: on this piece of naivete rests all aesthetics, it is the first truth of aesthetics. Let us immediately add its second: nothing is ugly but degenerate man -- the domain of aesthetic judgment is therewith defined.
What really raises one's indignation against suffering is not suffering intrinsically, but the senselessness of suffering.
Success has always been a great liar.
Never despair, but if you do, work on in despair.
Under the pressure of the cares and sorrows of our mortal condition, men have at all times, and in all countries, called in some physical aid to their moral consolations -- wine, beer, opium, brandy, or tobacco.
When the leaders choose to make themselves bidders at an auction of popularity, their talents, in the construction of the state, will be of no service. They will become flatterers instead of legislators; the instruments, not the guides, of the people.
America is the best half-educated country in the world.
The most important American addition to the World Experience was the simple surprising fact of America. We have helped prepare mankind for all its later surprises.
What you have to do is enter the fiction of America, enter America as fiction. It is, indeed, on this fictive basis that it dominates the world.
America is the country where you can buy a lifetime supply of aspirin For one dollar and use it up in two weeks.
Freedom is nothing else but a chance to be better.
So free we seem, so fettered we are!
As for freedom, it will soon cease to exist in any shape or form. Living will depend upon absolute obedience to a strict set of arrangements, which it will no longer be possible to transgress. The air traveler is not free. In the future, life's passengers will be even less so: they will travel through their lives fastened to their (corporate) seats.
No passion so effectually robs the mind of all its powers of acting and reasoning as fear.

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